Posts Tagged: language

Conceit via. Wikipedia

via Wikipedia, Conceit: In literature, a conceit is an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. By juxtaposing, usurping and manipulating images and ideas in surprising ways, a conceit invites the reader into a more sophisticated understanding of an object of comparison. Extended conceits in English are part

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Estoppel – Wikipedia

From Wikipedia: Estoppel. Estoppel in its broadest sense is a legal term referring to a series of legal and equitable doctrines that preclude “a person from denying or asserting anything to the contrary of that which has, in contemplation of law, been established as the truth, either by the acts of judicial or legislative officers,

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Confusing Sex and Rape

The New York Times addresses a topic that feminists have been trying to illuminate for years – the use by journalists of the word ‘sex’ in descriptions of non-consensual criminal acts that more properly should be called “rape” instead, and the importance of correcting that error for our common understanding of what constitutes a crime

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links for 2011-08-26

The New Wonder Woman Comic Is a Horror Comic — A Pantsless Horror Comic Hmmm. In general, I'm not a fan of horror anything – so the jury is out for me. But I'm still going to collect them for awhile just to see. (tags: WonderWoman DCComics) Words of war: Understanding military jargon – US

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links for 2010-04-06

The Editor and the Curator (Or the Context Analyst and the Media Synesthete) | Tomorrow Museum Joanne McNeil takes to task the folks in new media for their (mis)use of the term "curate" and "curator" when they really are talking about content selection, content aggregation and context analysis. (tags: art language media internet curators curation)

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links for 2010-02-05

On Language – Crash Blossoms – NYTimes.com Classic headline screw ups – “Squad Helps Dog Bite Victim” and “Red Tape Holds Up New Bridge.” (tags: writing headlines nytimes humor language) This is the title of a typical incendiary blog post – Coyote Crossing This sentence claims that there are many people who do not agree

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links for 2008-03-01

National Grammar Day: Brought to you by the Society for the Promotion of Good Grammar Vote for the worst grammar. No, I’m not one of the poll items. (tags: Grammar english funny) Feminism 101: “Calling Out Fellow Progressives for Sexism Prevents Unity on the Left” The second installment of Melissa McEwan’s excellent series on basic

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Say what now?

Alternate meanings for common words. Arbitrator \ar’-bi-tray-ter\: A cook that leaves Arby’s to work at McDonald’s. Avoidable \uh-voy’-duh-buhl\: What a bullfighter tries to do. Baloney \buh-lo’-nee\: Where some hemlines fall. Bernadette \burn’-a-det\: The act of torching a mortgage. Burglarize \bur’-gler-ize\: What a crook sees with. Control \kon-trol’\: A short, ugly inmate. Counterfeiters \kown-ter-fit-ers \: Workers

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The Chaos

by Gerard Nolst Trenité Dearest creature in creation Studying English pronunciation, I will teach you in my verse Sounds like corpse, corps, horse and worse. I will keep you, Susy, busy, Make your head with heat grow dizzy; Tear in eye, your dress you’ll tear; Queer, fair seer, hear my prayer. Pray, console your loving

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On the Subject of the words “Faggot” and “Dyke”

Other that some passing linkage, I haven’t weighed in on the controversy surrounding actor Isaiah Washington and his use of the F-word twice in the last three months on the set of “Grey’s Anatomy” and at the Golden Globes. The New York Times summarizes the events. Given that there has been lots of commentary, I

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English “Non-Errors” Examined

I blogged a link yesterday to a site of “Non-Errors” in English — discussion of some language rules that the site argues are not really valid rules of language today. The link is making the rounds of popular blog sites, which is how I picked up on it. I sent it to Stephanie, who is

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My Lexicon

A handy guide to my personal idioms and their origins, because I notice that a lot of times people look at me funny when I’m talking. I’ve had this page around for awhile but forgot to transfer it into my new content management system. There seem to be some terms missing, too. "Big Girl" Seats

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Biomimicry, the law of unintended consequences, Chinese water torture

Via wikipedia: Biomimicry Biomimicry or biomimetics is the examination of nature, its models, systems, processes, and elements to emulate or take inspiration from in order to solve human problems. The term biomimicry and biomimetics come from the Greek words bios, meaning life, and mimesis, meaning to imitate. Similar terms include bionics. Law of unintended consequences

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‘Cultural Generations’ via wikipedia

via wikipedia, Cultural generations , i.e., “Baby Boomer” and “Generation X.” Generation X: Generation X, commonly abbreviated to Gen X, is the generation born after the Western Post–World War II baby boom. Demographers, historians and commentators use beginning birth dates from the early 1960s to the early 1980s. The term was popularized by Douglas Coupland’s

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I don’t need your dictionary; I gots my own lexicon

Merriam-Webster gives us a list of their favorite top-ten words that are not in the dictionary. I’ve heard ginormous before, and my sister has used slickery on occasion. I have my own lexicon of made up words and phrases, although because of cognitive displaysia, there are some things I’ve forgotten to add.

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Hanzi Smatter

My friend Lori’s site pointed me in the direction of this: Hanzi Smatter is a site that looks at Chinese or Japanese language characters that Americans have adopted as logos or tattoos and analyzes what they really mean. Which is often not at all what the American intended it to mean. Sort of their revenge

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Dialect Survey Results

Or, how to pronounce shit. Check out the maps where the wrong answer is concentrated in the south. And my favorite sample question: “What do you call the big clumps of dust that gather under furniture and in corners?” Also: “What do you say when you want to lay claim to the front seat of

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Who is Running Our Country?

Garner: Americans Should Beat Chests with Pride: The retired general overseeing Iraq’s postwar reconstruction said on Wednesday that his fellow Americans should beat their chests with pride at having toppled Saddam Hussein (news – web sites) without destroying the country’s assets. (Except for those crappy 5,000-year-old artifacts in the Iraqi National Museum. But who gives

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Two new verbs

Two new verbs: To Harris: To steal something, not for oneself, but on behalf of someone else in order to curry favor. To Scalia: To use unethical means to run down the clock on one’s opponent.

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How To Write Good

by Frank L. Visco and others Always avoid alliteration. Prepositions are not words to end sentences with. Avoid clichés like the plague — they’re old hat. Employ the vernacular. Eschew ampersands & abbreviations, etc. Parenthetical remarks (however relevant) are unnecessary. Parenthentical words however must be enclosed in commas. It is wrong to ever split an

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Great Oxymorons

p class=”author”>Author Unknown Act naturally Advanced BASIC Airline Food Almost exactly Alone together American history British fashion Business ethics Butt head Childproof Christian scientists Clearly misunderstood Computer jock Computer security Definite maybe Diet ice cream Exact estimate Extinct Life Found missing French bravery Genuine imitation Good grief Government organization Legally drunk Living dead Microsoft Works

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New Metric Conversions

Author Unknown 10**12 Microphones = 1 Megaphone 10**6 bicycles = 2 megacycles 500 millilaries = 1 seminary 2000 mockingbirds = two kilomockingbirds 10 cards = 1 decacards 1/2 lavatory = 1 demijohn 10**-6 = 1 microfiche 453.6 graham crackers = 1 pound cake 10**21 piccolos = 1 gigolo 10 rations = 1 decoration 100 rations

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