Books

This is why I no longer read anything from DC Comics

This is a scene from the brand-new video game Batman Arkham Knight, in which Batgirl (Barbara Gordon), after she has been injured and is in a wheelchair, is held captive under the control of the Joker, and is made to kill herself in front of Batman. The scene is “Fake” in that she’s “not really

Read on »

2015-03-15 Recently Read

Cool stuff I’ve read recently. Andrew Keir: Split ink Fountain Printing ypically when printing, a single colour only is used in each ink fountain (pictures to follow), and while gradients can be printed using modern process colour printing – the standard mix of cyan, magenta, yellow and black found in your average home/office printer –

Read on »

The Naming of Cats

by T. S. Eliot The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter, It isn’t just one of your holiday games; You may think at first I’m as mad as a hatter When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES. First of all, there’s the name that the family use daily, Such as

Read on »

100 novels everyone should read – Telegraph

Another “books you should read” list, this time from the telegraph. The one’s I’ve read are crossed off. This is actually a pretty good list – mostly classics, and not a single Ayn Rand title on it. Source: Telegraph “100 novels everyone should read” The best novels of all time from Tolkien to Proust and

Read on »

East of the Sun and West of the Moon

Wikipedia: “East of the Sun and West of the Moon” is a Norwegian folk tale. The White Bear approaches a poor peasant and asks if he will give him his youngest daughter; in return, he will make the man rich. The girl is reluctant, so the peasant asks the bear to return, and persuades her

Read on »

Read 26 Indy Reading Challenge for 2014

Early in January of 2014, Indy Star Reporter Michael Anthony Adams issued a challenge to Indiana residents for the new year: New Year’s resolutions are rarely acted on. I’m guilty of it, and you’re guilty of it. The trick is to have support, which is exactly what #Read26Indy is. But instead of having a few

Read on »

A Brave and Startling Truth – Maya Angelou

NY Times: Maya Angelou, Lyrical Witness of the Jim Crow South, Dies at 86 We, this people, on a small and lonely planet Traveling through casual space Past aloof stars, across the way of indifferent suns To a destination where all signs tell us It is possible and imperative that we learn A brave and

Read on »

Writing off Jennifer Weiner

I don’t know how it’s possible, but after reading this New Yorker profile “Written Off” by Rebecca Mead, I love Jennifer Weiner more than I did before reading it, although it’s widely being described as “a take-down” piece. The profile starts out fine, but about half-way through, the paragraph that starts “Weiner has also taken

Read on »

My DC Comics Pull List Purge

The only comment that DC Comics has made so far about the epic fuck-up that they have made with Batwoman and refusing to allow her to be married [Batwoman writers leave DC Comics over ban on same-sex marriage] is this: “As acknowledged by the creators involved, the editorial differences with the writers of BATWOMAN had

Read on »

Batwoman writers leave DC Comics over ban on same-sex marriage

J.H. Williams III and Haden Blackman — longtime writers of the Batwoman comic book — are leaving DC Comics over a dispute about editorial changes to their planned story lines, including being forbidden to show the main character marrying her same-sex partner. Cross-posted by the authors to both author sites: Unfortunately, in recent months, DC

Read on »

Supergirl First

The case for why DC should tackle a Supergirl movie before a Wonder Woman movie. I wrote a little bit a few weeks ago about the importance of getting the Wonder Woman storyline right when she is written in comics, books, television and movies. If I had a huge ego, I’d say the folks at

Read on »

Favorite Quotes – Mario Savio

There is a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part. You can’t even passively take part! And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to

Read on »

Favorite Quotes: White Dude Mating Calls

It’s a tedious way of saying “Don’t make me feel bad for being an asshole”, which seems to be the mating call of a whole lot of white dudes. — from Women in Secularism 2: Breaking News: Even at WiS, we have to defend the purpose of WiS!

Read on »

Rage of Thrones (by Axis of Awesome)

I waited six years for Dance with Dragons… a bit NSFW. Although it’s a little problematic that they cast the “newbie wannabe geek” that he yells at as a woman. In my experience, I know as many women who’ve read the books as men have. Although I do know a lot of book worms, so…

Read on »

Week 1: What is gender? Theories and views

Gender Through Comic Books Online Course at Canvas.net. The Course Syllabus Class hasn’t started, but I can already tell by the reading materials that I’m going to be FIRED UP about some of this week’s subject, because I’ve written about it before! The readings from Lorber are definitely a feminist take on gender, but it’s

Read on »

‘Beasts of battle’ via Wikipedia

Via wikipedia: Beasts of battle: The Beasts of battle is a poetic trope in Old English and Old Norse literature. It consists of the wolf, the raven, and the eagle, traditional animals accompanying the warriors to feast on the bodies of the slain. It occurs in eight Old English poems and in the Old Norse

Read on »

Awesome fan-made Wonder Woman video

She actually fights Nazis in this video, which is supposed to be her thing, unlike today where she’s just fighting greek mythology or some such. And her boots are really cool. Female Super Hero Fan Film from Jesse V. Johnson on Vimeo.

Read on »

Gender Through Comic Books Online Course

Very cool news from comic writer Mark Waid: For the last few months, a talented university teacher named Christy Blanch has been putting together a college-level course called “Gender Through Comic Books”–but it’s not limited to college students. It’s the world’s first comics-related Massive Open Online Course (MOOC)–meaning that it will be FREELY AVAILABLE to

Read on »

Thought for the week

Instead of assuming that people are dumb, ignorant, and making mistakes, assume they are smart, doing their best, and that you lack context. — Nicholas C. Zakas (@slicknet) February 10, 2013 This particular tweet has stuck in my head all week long because I need to remember it when I’m considering other folks and things

Read on »

Nancy Drew “Girl Detective” T-shirt

I’ve loved Nancy Drew since I was a kid, and I had a cool shirt with Pamela Sue Martin’s face on in when I was in elementary school. I always wished I had one with the silhouette on it, so I made one for myself. And you, if you want to buy one. They’re for

Read on »

Wonder Woman and Superman? Why?

Entertainment Weekly reveals that in an upcoming issue of the Justice League, Wonder Woman and Superman will start knocking boots. Yup. From the reaction I saw on Facebook and the comments at DC Women Kicking Ass, fans don’t seem to be into it, and it doesn’t break down across male/female gender lines the way discussions

Read on »

Captain Marvel T-Shirt

I added my first Marvel Comics title to my comic book pull list today – Captain Marvel. The “new” Captain Marvel is the former “Ms. Marvel” — Carol Danvers the female adjunct to Captain Marvel from the old comics, before he died. She’s had a comic for years, but Marvel has reworked her costume and

Read on »

Dostoevsky on the Problem of Evil

Dostoevsky on the Problem of Evil. … And if the sufferings of children go to swell the sum of sufferings which was necessary to pay for truth, then I protest that the truth is not worth such a price. I don’t want the mother to embrace the oppressor who threw her son to the dogs!

Read on »

On Wonder Woman #8, Fanboy Flakkers & The Sanctity Of Myth

On Wonder Woman #8, Fanboy Flakkers & The Sanctity Of Myth (Part 1 of 2) by “Too Busy Thinking About My Comics”. It seems that Azzarello has been granted free reign by the flakkers to reinterpret anything at all except for those aspects which serve to perpetuate misogyny. The supposed vileness of Queen Hippolyta and

Read on »

Quotable

Stephanie, on why she doesn’t want to see Titanic in 3-D: I thought it was overhyped in the first place. And at the scene were the ship hits the iceberg, and the guy says “How long do we have?!” I looked at my watch and said “You have an hour and a half.”

Read on »

State of Wonder by Ann Patchett

December’s book club book was State of Wonder and I managed to get it read this time. (It’s been hit-or-miss the last several book club meetings because I’ve been doing my own writing or reading other books or *ahem* reading tons of fan fiction.) The synopsis — which I usually tend to steal from somewhere

Read on »

Word Count for Famous Novels (organized)

Word count for famous novels, in ascending order by number of words. Based on this list compiled by Nicole Humphrey Cook. (Thanks Nicole, and sorry for stealing; I wanted to see the list in order.) For average word counts based on genre, see this handy reference. Also, here’s another list I may swipe and add

Read on »

Personal Truth

I’ve posted this quote before, but it came up in conversation recently, and I was struck again by how very beautiful it is. May Sarton, from Journal of a Solitude: “My own belief is that one regards oneself, if one is a serious writer, as an instrument for experiencing. Life–all of it–flows through this instrument

Read on »

‘The Ancient of Days’, ‘Thumos’ via wikipedia

via wikipedia: The Ancient of Days The title “Ancient of Days” has been used as a source of inspiration in art and music, denoting the Creator’s aspects of eternity combined with perfection. William Blake’s watercolour and relief etching entitled “The Ancient of Days” is one such example. The Ancient of Days is the title of

Read on »

Oh darn – delicious links auto-publishing died

Shoot. My blogging crutch went away. For the past five or six years I’ve been using a little-known and not very well supported delicious links tool to auto-publish the links I’ve saved to my site. It was easy because I could hit a bookmarklet when I was on an interesting page and delicious would save

Read on »

Super Hero Cape

This is one of my current knitting projects – super hero capes for kids. I’m making at least three and possibly four of them; two red, (for Superman and Supergirl) one blue (Batgirl) and one white with gold trim (oh Mighty Isis), for some small folks I know. I started Saturday and made significant progress

Read on »

links for 2011-09-01

Stupid Game of Thrones Characters – Dorkly Article If you’re a fan of Game of Thrones, you’re undoubtedly familiar with the Stupid Ned Stark meme. Hilarious as it is, the other idiots get off scot-free. Let’s fix that. (WARNING: SPOILERS) (tags: GameOfThrones memes funny) Don't talk down to little girls: Lisa Bloom explains why Ask

Read on »

Wonder Woman, Batwoman and the new DC Comics

I’ve always been on the verge of being a comic book geek, without every quite arriving. As a kid I was a fan of the girl super heroes — I loved Wonder Woman, Isis and Batgirl on television, but my family wasn’t much into comic books and my lack of transport to a comics shop

Read on »

Surprising Literary Marketing

In the New York Times – How Writers Build the Brand The surprising ways that some classic authors did some marketing prostitution (ahem) to promote their literary endeavors. “Bloomsbury set regularly posed for fashion shoots in British Vogue in the 1920s. The frumpy Virginia Woolf even went on a “Pretty Woman”-style shopping expedition at French

Read on »

A Song of Ice and Fire

The HBO series A Game of Thrones starts tonight, and author George R. R. Martin responds on his blog to the off-base New York Times article by Ginia Bellafante claiming that the fantasy genre of literature is “boy fiction” and that his series attracts women by spicing up his novels with graphic sex. As he

Read on »

Amber Benson’ Death’s Daughter Book Contest

I should probably not add competitors to my own contest entry, but if you’re at all a fan of Amber Benson’s Death’s Daughter series, the third book in the series ( Serpent’s Storm ) is coming out in the next few days, and you can win a copy of it in a contest at Bitten

Read on »

Quote of the day

In the comments of this Jezebel article on a weird guy who hates Emma Watson on his blog: “Honestly who can hate Emma Watson? She’s yet to do one annoying thing in public and she’s as adorable as a bucket of kittens.” True dat. Leave the poor girl alone to get her degree, people.

Read on »

Another thing I love about fanfiction.net

The site has great mobile stylesheets You can read on your mobile device, which is why I was the only blissfully happy person standing amidst a crowd of very disgruntled people for an hour and a half in the security line at La Guardia. So yes, I was basically reading what amounts to very light

Read on »

Tails and Tales

Tim O’Brian In The Atlantic – discussing the sources of creativity and how to tell a well-imagined story: My sons, Timmy and Tad–both fans of Winnie the Pooh–have taken lately to wearing tails. At our local Wal-Mart, and occasionally at church, the boys sport lengths of clothesline dangling from their trousers. They prowl the neighborhood

Read on »

Some Thoughts on “Gang Leader for a Day”

Again cleaning out some old notes and writing, I came across some thoughts I had about the book “Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets” and the subsequent discussion we had about it in book club. I started to write this, but felt I needed to do some additional research

Read on »

Stuff I’ve added to my “to read” list

Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and his Rendezvous with American History Wittgenstein’s Mistress You Lost Me There Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life UPDATE: I never acquired the first and second. I read the third book, and own the fourth but haven’t read it yet.

Read on »

Me and my shallow brain

Howdy? How have you all been. It’s been so long since we talked. I’ve been cheating on you with Facebook, I admit it. But Facebook is giving me tennis elbow, (damned Farmville!) so I need to lay off the junk for awhile. Also, according to Nicholas Carr in his rather alarming book The Shallows: What

Read on »

Reading in Cambridgeshire

Sometime last year I managed to lose track of my reading list. I started to keep better track in January of this year, but I never managed to keep the list updated. So after 14 years of tracking every book I’ve read – I managed to lose track hopelessly. Ah well. I’m happier this way.

Read on »

Diane Arbus

I picked up Diane Arbus: A Biography at the library without really having an idea who she was. It happened to be on a kiosk of other photography books that the Nora branch was featuring, and I thought – “hey a woman photographer. I should check her out.” I’m not sure why I have that

Read on »

I totally thought of it myself, I swear

Things you may hear me say soon: “There are chemicals in the brain called neurotransmitters…” 4 person douche canoe Sites I may link to from time to time: http://getyourownmotherfuckingblogasshole.wordpress.com/ Let Me Google That For You

Read on »

links for 2010-04-05

The cult of busy « Scott Berkun I deliberately try not to fill my calendar. I choose not to say Yes to everything. For to do so would make me too busy, and I think, less effective at what my goals are. I always want to have some margin of my time in reserve, time

Read on »

Pay your damned taxes, deadbeat

“Personal property is the effect of society; and it is as impossible for an individual to acquire personal property without the aid of Society, as it is for him to make land originally. Separate an individual from Society, and give him an island or a continent to possess, and he cannot acquire… He cannot become

Read on »

links for 2010-02-20

Designing with Progressive Enhancement: Building the web that works for everyone. By Filament Group: Todd Parker, Patty Toland, Scott Jehl, Maggie Costello Wachs Designing with Progressive Enhancement is a practical guide that both explains the principles and benefits of progressive enhancement, and explores detailed examples to teach you how, where, and when to implement specific

Read on »

links for 2010-01-29

Twisted Drop Stitch Scarf Pattern « Kis*Knit Bookmarking because I needed this: "Create a twisted drop stitch: Insert needle into the stitch as if to knit. Instead of wrapping the yarn around the back needle to create a regular knit stitch, wrap yarn around both needles and then wrap around the back needle. Complete stitch

Read on »

links for 2010-01-21

The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House What follows is a brief discussion of Audre Lorde's often-quoted statement, "The master's tools will never dismantle the master's house." (tags: feminism Lorde ideas) Hej Cyklist! Copenhagen Has a New Bike-friendly Feature – GOOD Blog – GOOD Copenhagen installs food rests for cyclists stopped at lights.

Read on »

links for 2009-12-10

Essay – When Bad Covers Happen to Good Books – NYTimes.com (tags: design books arts) The Noughtie List: the 2000s in Review (kottke.org) List of "Best of the Decades" lists from all over the web. (tags: bestof2000s bestof2009) How to Make Romance Last – MSN Relationships – article According to the article — "Men and

Read on »

links for 2009-11-02

Bobbs-Merrill Company – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (tags: education reading) 20th-Century American Bestsellers: House of a Thousand Candles information about the Indianapolis written novel. (tags: ideas Indiana novel MeredithNicholson) The House of a Thousand Candles (1936) – Overview – MSN Movies Synopsis of the movie, which seems much different to me than the book I

Read on »

Richard Dawkins

I went with our friend Mike down to Bloomington to visit our friend Joe and to see Richard Dawkins speak at the IU auditorium last night. He was there to read from and discuss his newest book The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution. I don’t have the book and haven’t read it,

Read on »

links for 2009-10-09

atypically.knit – Hogwarts house scarves I made up my own pattern for mine and it came out well, but these are more polished that mind and I think I'll make one like this, too. (tags: knitting HarryPotter scarf) Yarn, Patterns, Knitting and Crocheting (tags: knitting catalog shop supplies) One Family’s Roots, a Nation’s History –

Read on »

5th Sentence, recurrent

I’ve done this meme a half-dozen times before, but it’s always different because the books is never the same. Rules for this Experiment: Grab the book nearest you. Right now. Turn to page 56. Find the fifth sentence. Post that sentence along with these instructions. “Here is Queen Victoria photographed in 1893 by George W.

Read on »

Books I’ve Read Recently – July 2009 updated

I’ve finished two of my Project Fill-in-the-gaps books – The Book Thief and Motherless Brooklyn, and filled in with some paperback mysteries and fun stuff. Right now I’m slogging through some titles for work, and enjoying the guilty pleasure of Ana Marie Cox’s thinly-veiled political fiction. The Book Thief – Markus Zusak Motherless Brooklyn –

Read on »

Conservatives

I don’t dislike conservatives as people, I just think the conservative ideology is morally and ethically bankrupt, utterly repugnant, intellectually stunted, and should be eliminated from the philosophical arena. Conservatives themselves are just fine, so long as they don’t either act on their conservative ideology or demand special privileges such as being able to vote.

Read on »

Books I’ve Read – April, 2009

Larry Burrows: Vietnam by Larry Burrows A classic, iconographic photography book. Burrows was a Life Magazine photographer covering the Vietnam war, and his images shot over 9 years helped shape the American public’s understanding and opinions about it. He was killed over Cambodia when his helicopter was shot down. 100 Photographs that Changed the World

Read on »

Project Fill-in-the-Gaps

Project Fill-in-the-Gaps created by Moonrat on her blog Editorial Ass: fill in the gaps in your reading lists of classics and contemporary fiction. Make a list of 100 titles, give yourself 5 years to complete reading the list, and give yourself 25% “accident forgiveness” – consider the task accomplished if you achieve 75 titles in

Read on »

Books I’ve Read – First quarter 2009

Wow, I’ve done horribly at documenting my reading for this year. Maybe I need to just give up trying to do posts for every book and just aggregate them into 1 post each quarter. Here’s what I’ve read in the first quarter of 2009: D’Aulaires’ Book of Norse Myths by Ingri D’Aulaire I loved D’Aulaires’

Read on »

Addendum to Books I Read in 2008

I had the time to get some extra reading in over the holidays, and I managed to add a couple of books to my list at the end of the year. And good ones, too. The Big Book Of Lesbian Horse Stories by Alisa Surkis and Monica Nolan No, the horses aren’t lesbians. The lesbians

Read on »

Books I Read in 2008

It’s my 12th Annual end of the year reading recap. Grand total: 30 books. I don’t think that’s my lowest total, but it’s no 98 titles like in 1997. And boy, oh boy did I hit the genre fiction this year. It did help to have lots of fun light reading while all the wedding

Read on »

Books I’ve Read – November and December 2008

A Grave Talent (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King To Play The Fool (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King With Child (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King Earlier this year, I read the fourth and fifth books in the Kate Martinelli Series. This time I circled back around and read the first

Read on »

Recently Acquired Books

Books I just picked up from the book store: Full Frontal Feminism: A Young Woman’s Guide to Why Feminism Matters by Jessica Valenti Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Read on »

Buy a book this weekend

Editorial Ass has some good advice for those in the book publishing industry. Since I’m one of those people, and I’m married to one, and most of my friends have something to do with publishing, I’m going to quote quite a bit of this blog post: Let’s talk a little bit about what happened in

Read on »

Still I Rise

Maya Angelou You may write me down in history With your bitter, twisted lies, You may trod me in the very dirt But still, like dust, I’ll rise. Does my sassiness upset you? Why are you beset with gloom? ‘Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells Pumping in my living room. Just like moons

Read on »

Barack Obama on saggy pants

In an MTV interview – Obama tells you to pull up your pants. He does it more politely than I do to teenagers in target. Sway: Our next question comes from Eric out of Huntington Beach, California: “There are numerous cultures and subcultures in the United States today. Powers-that-be set statutes with monetary penalty on

Read on »

David Sedaris on Undecided Voters

From this week’s New Yorker: Then you’ll see this man or woman– someone, I always think, who looks very happy to be on TV. “Well, Charlie,” they say, “I’ve gone back and forth on the issues and whatnot, but I just can’t seem to make up my mind!” Some insist that there’s very little difference

Read on »

Obama’s Steady Hand

“It’s my belief that this is exactly the time when the American people need to hear from the person who in approximately 40 days will be responsible for dealing with this mess,” said Obama. “Part of the president’s job is to deal with more than one thing at once.”

Read on »

David Foster Wallace Dead at 46

Writer David Foster Wallace hung himself on Friday at the age of 46. That’s really awful. My heart goes out to his family. Would it be completely inappropriate to point out that he’s wearing my wool coat in this photo? I’m just saying.

Read on »

Favorite children’s book character?

This came out of a discussion at work — who’s your favorite children’s book character? Obviously, mine is Curious George, but there are lots on my list. Who is on yours? The Complete Adventures of Curious George: 70th Anniversary Edition

Read on »

Quote of the Day: Reform

Courtesy “O Brother Where Art Thou“: Reform? I’ll reform you, you soft-headed sonofabitch! How we gonna run reform when we’re the damn incumbent! Y’ignorant slope-shouldered sack a guts! Why we’d look like a buncha satchel-ass Johnnie-Come-Latelies braggin’ on our own midget! Don’t matter how stumpy! And that’s the goddamn problem right there – people think

Read on »

Words that end in “-ist” for a thousand, Alex

In creating my current “recently read” list today, I noticed an oddity in my reading choices… The Archivist: A Novel by Martha Cooley The Egyptologist: A Novel by Arthur Phillips Here Lies the Librarian by Richard Peck Maps and Legends by Michael Chabon The Fencing Master by Arturo Perez-Reverte Previously, my reading list included The

Read on »

Eliminationist Quotes from Conservative Voices

What, really, is eliminationism? It’s a fairly self-explanatory term: it describes a kind of politics and culture that shuns dialogue and the democratic exchange of ideas for the pursuit of outright elimination of the opposing side, either through complete suppression, exile and ejection, or extermination. Source: Eliminationism in America: Appendix “I tell people don’t kill

Read on »

Book Meme: What I’ve Read

(via Publishing Careers) The National Endowment for the Arts has an initiative you may have heard of called the Big Read. According to the website, its purpose is to “restore reading to the center of American culture.” They estimate that the average adult has only read 6 of the top 100 books they’ve printed. Here’s

Read on »

Indiana teacher suspended for giving students a book

Showing up on CNN yesterday, this Indiana story: Perry Township teacher Connie Heermann a 27 year teaching veteran, was suspended from her job at Perry Meridian High School for a year and a half without pay, for giving her high school English class the book Freedom Writer’s Diary: How a Teacher and 150 Teens Used

Read on »

Woodie Guthrie on songwriting

“I hate a song that makes you think that you are not any good. I hate a song that makes you think that you are just born to lose. Bound to lose. No good to nobody. No good for nothing. Because you are too old or too young or too fat or too slim too

Read on »

What I’ve Read Recently

The problem I had with being unfocused and skipping from book to book seems to have passed, post-wedding. At one point, I believe I had 9 books partially read. I haven’t gone back to finish any of them, but started fresh with some lighter summer reading in order to carry paperbacks on the plane with

Read on »

Um, no, dear. Not really.

“It is because of me — I definitely think [my show] has helped the movement. Before it came out, everyone was still a little apprehensive about [same sex relationships]. Then they realized, ‘Wow, everyone is really into this stuff, and it is fine.’ The next thing you know, [gay marriage] is legal.” — Tila Tequila

Read on »

Reading: Ruth 1:16-17

Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God: Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the LORD do so to

Read on »

1st Corinthians 13:4-13

Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant. Love does not act unbecomingly; it does not seek its own, is not provoked, does not take into account a wrong suffered, does not rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes

Read on »

Selections from Leaves of Grass, Song of the Open Road

by Walt Whitman from verse 9 However sweet these laid-up stores–however convenient this dwelling, we cannot remain here; However shelter’d this port, and however calm these waters, we must not anchor here; However welcome the hospitality that surrounds us, we are permitted to receive it but a little while. … from verse 11 Listen! I

Read on »

“Reading Is Fundamental” Literacy Program in Danger

If you’re about my age (39, that is) the commercials and reading programs for the nonprofit program RIF – Reading is Fundamental – are probably as vivid a childhood memory for you as they are for me. Not only were they played during Sesame Street and the Electric Company, but they were part of the

Read on »

Book Review Catch-Up – Spring 2008

Boy, am I behind on recording what I’ve read. I’ve had this post in progress forever trying to summarize some of these books, and I kept tacking new titles onto the end. I finally stole enough free time to get it finished. The Geographer’s Library by Jon Fasman A literary history suspense novel, along the

Read on »

links for 2008-02-28

Afghan Women’s lives worse than ever “Grinding poverty and the escalating war is driving an increasing number of Afghan families to sell their daughters into forced marriages.” – “W for women” indeed. (tags: misogyny women violence buhs) GOP Halts Effort to Retrieve White House E-Mails – washingtonpost.com Of course. You wouldn’t want them to get

Read on »

links for 2008-01-25

Main Page – Chickipedia Encyclopedia of photos of hot women. (tags: funny women reference) My Way News – Ledger Had 6 Types of Prescription Drugs Only 6? Wow, don’t come to our house. I have 6 prescriptions drugs just for my stupid allergies. (tags: news celebrity) Think Progress » John Gibson Mocks ‘Weirdo’ Heath Ledger’s

Read on »

Laser Eye Surgery: Getting my eyeballs replaced

As someone at work put it. I’m getting laser surgery (specifically PKR) done on my eyes tomorrow by Dr. Waltz of TLC of Indianapolis. I’m doing my traditional “Stress relief by just not thinking about it” form of denial, so I don’t freak out. It couldn’t possibly be worse than the surgeries I’ve already had.

Read on »

Weekend Update: 2008-01-06

Dunno what my last journal entry covered, so let me start at the top – we rang in 2008 at the traditional party at Dan and Doug’s, which is always fun and pretty low-key, and thankfully a few blocks away so we don’t have to risk life and limb. I got really toasted, but managed

Read on »

Books I Got for Christmas 2007

Part of the awesome loot I got this holiday season from my family. The Daring Book for Girls by Andrea J. Buchanan and Miriam Peskowitz The Best of MAKE Magazine by Mark Frauenfelder and Gareth Branwyn Guerrilla Gardening: A Manualfesto by David Tracey Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight, Volume 1: The Long Way Home

Read on »

What I Read in 2007 (38 Titles)

Definitely not a banner year for reading for me. I’m hoping with my New Year’s Resolution to concentrate more on my own library, that I’ll get through a few more books next year. This is the 11th year I’ve recorded everything I’ve read; I began in 1997, a year in which I read 92 books.

Read on »

End of Year Reading 2007

I’ve read a lot more the last two months of the year, thanks to the writer’s strike. (Go, writers!) Collage Discovery Workshop: Make Your Own Collage Creations Using Vintage Photos, Found Objects and Ephemera by Claudine Hellmuth One of the best collage craft books I’ve found, I’m going to buy this one for some future

Read on »

Spychips by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre

Recent reading: Spychips: How Major Corporations and Government Plan to Track Your Every Purchase and Watch Your Every Move by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre From the Electronic Frontier Foundation: Radio-frequency identification (RFID) “tags” are small wireless devices that emit unique identifiers when interrogated by RFID readers or sensors. Today, both government and the private

Read on »

Books, Books, Books

This past weekend, Stephanie and I went to my company’s warehouse employee book sale. This is where they lay out all the returned stock from bookstores and let us purchase it at a steep discount, which means that it doesn’t need to get recycled or trashed. It’s one of the great perks of my job

Read on »

Twilight

After complaining that I’m frustrated by my start and stop reading lately, I sat down with our next book club selection, Twilight, and finished it in less that 24 hours. Abiding by the first rule of book club, I won’t discuss the book, but obviously I blazed through it. (it’s about vampires, and I liked

Read on »

Recent Reading

It was about this time last year that I got behind in reviewing what I had read recently and gave up and simply posted a list of recent reads. Must be the time of year. I’ve definitely been having trouble getting through any book; I have tons of things half read, and I’m very frustrated

Read on »

J.K. Rowling: Dumbledore was gay.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald: Harry Potter fans, the rumours are true: Albus Dumbledore, master wizard and Headmaster of Hogwarts, is gay. JK Rowling, author of the mega-selling fantasy series, outed the beloved character today while appearing before a full house at Carnegie Hall in New York. After reading briefly from the final book,

Read on »

kerouac

Louis Menand in the New Yorker, on kerouac… Kerouac credited the inspiration for the scroll to Cassady–specifically, to a long letter, supposedly around thirteen thousand words, that Cassady wrote over several days (he was on speed) in December, 1950. This is known as the “Joan letter,” because its ostensible subject is a girlfriend of Cassady’s

Read on »

Best Acceptance Speech Ever

“A lot of people come up here and thank Jesus for this award. I want you to know that no one had less to do with this award than Jesus. Can you believe this shit? Hell has frozen over. Suck it, Jesus, this award is my god now.” — Kathy Griffin, accepting an Emmy award

Read on »

My New Favorite Quote

“My favorite definition of a libertarian- and I can’t remember where I stole it from- is ‘a conservative who wants to sleep with liberal women.’” — From the comments on Pandagon’s article: “But Rush told me you had to tolerate my dick in your mouth” Funny because it’s true.

Read on »

Everything is Miscellaneous

I mentioned the book Everything is Miscellaneous a few posts back on my list of recent reads, but I wanted to pull it out and write more about it, because it was very thought provoking, and a book I intend to buy (I borrowed it from the library) because I want to read it again.

Read on »

What To Read, What To Read

So, I’m trying to pick out what books to take on our cruise next week. Because of course that’s the most important thing to pack; clothes can just be plucked from the basket and chucked into the suitcase willy nilly the day before we leave, but reading requires some actual planning. (Now if this sounds

Read on »

Book Review Catch-Up

I’m way behind on writing little synopses of the books I’ve finished this year, so I’m consolidating this latest list. Looking back, this happened about this time of year last year, too. Must be a trend. Anyways, here’s what I read since whenever. Sword of the Guardian: A Legend of Ithyria (Legends of Ithyria) by

Read on »

Pandagon’s Harry Potter Thread

The Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows discussion over on Pandagon – The Life and Loves of Severus Snape – is a thing to be hold, weighing in a something like 892 comments so far (including mine, added below the fold here). Including some excellent dissection of the book, the series, the author, and an

Read on »

the college professor in modern literature and film

After reading Zadie Smith’s “On Beauty” for book club, I found this article from the American Scholar on the college professor as portrayed in modern literature and film interesting: The absentminded professor, that kindly old figure, is long gone. A new image has taken his place, one that bespeaks not only our culture’s hostility to

Read on »

Rejected Openings for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

From theonering.net One morning, when Harry Potter woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single wizard in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wand. The sky above Privet Drive was the color of television,

Read on »

My Past Falwell Greatest Hits

Jokes about Falwell from the past that people are suddenly linking to now that he’s died. No guarantees on the quality of the jokes… The Theological Significance of Tinky Winky 6 Reasons Tinky Winky Can’t Be Gay The Top 13 Reasons Jerry Falwell Thinks Your Favorite TV Character is Gay The Batty Hymn of the

Read on »

Books I’m In the Middle Of…

Every once it a while I can’t decide what to read, so I pick up more than one book and I have several of them halfway done; this is one of those times. Sword of the Guardian: A Legend of Ithyria (Legends of Ithyria) by Merry Shannon Actually, I finished this cheesy lesbian fantasy fiction

Read on »

Michele Bachmann

“Any of you who have members of your family that are in the lifestyle – we have a member of our family that is. This is not funny. It’s a very sad life. It’s part of Satan, I think, to say this is gay. It’s anything but gay.” – Michele Bachmann, (R) Minnesota 6th District.

Read on »

Clerks II

“Well then, you must be as blind as Anne Frank, ’cause what’s the point in having an internet connection if you’re not using it to look at weird, fucked-up pictures of dirty sex you’ll never have yourself?” – Clerks II

Read on »

The Bushes are “suffering”

On the Today Show this morning: ANN CURRY: Do you know the American people are suffering… watching [Iraq]? LAURA BUSH: Oh, I know that very much, and, believe me, no suffers more than their president and I do when we watch this. And certainly the commander-in-chief who has asked our military to go into harm’s

Read on »

Heir to the Glimmering World

I also can’t find enough time to write a synopsis of Heir to the Glimmering World – a book I picked up in Chicago last July and just finished reading, so again I’m going to cheat and give you the synopsis/review From Publishers Weekly instead: Ozick’s previous novel, The Puttermesser Papers, revolved around one quirky

Read on »

The Thirteenth Tale

Unfortunately, I don’t have time to write a synopsis of The Thirteenth Tale – (I’ve been meaning to since I finished this fun, enjoyable book three weeks ago!) so I’ll have to cheat and give you Amazon’s instead: Settle down to enjoy a rousing good ghost story with Diane Setterfield’s debut novel, The Thirteenth Tale.

Read on »

David Sedaris Exaggerates!

The New Republic comes out with a world-rocking revelation: David Sedaris embellishes his humorous non-fiction memoirs. Um, no shit, Sherlock. You needed to write an article to tell us this? He’s a humor writer. I sort of figured out he was gilding the lily on my own, thanks. As if any one person has that

Read on »

The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters

A strange Victorian Steampunk novel that I enjoyed, despite it’s length and rather confusing cast of villains. Celeste Temple is a young English woman raised in the West Indies and residing in London awaiting a future wedding to her fiancé, Roger Bascombe. When he sends her a curt note breaking their engagement, she decides to

Read on »

The Big Over Easy: A Nursery Crime

A new series by the author of the bestselling “Tuesday Next” novels. A thoroughly enjoyable read; I polished it off in a weekend. Fforde’s novels are funny and full of literary cleverness. Jack Spratt is an likeable and entertaining protagonist and I look forward to reading the entire series. The Big Over Easy: A Nursery

Read on »

The Secret, Oprah, and the idea of “magical thinking”

Somewaterytart at Shakespeare’s Sister tackles the subject of the new DVD/Book “The Secret” that Oprah’s been touting. I’m inclined to agree with much of what she says. I first heard about the book from my mom, who works for Barnes and Noble, where the book is apparently flying off the shelves, so I resisted blurting

Read on »

Favorite Quotes

“Stop feeling sorry for yourself because someone said you’re going to die. I got an idea that’s gonna help us both. Now it is dangerous, and there’s a very good chance you will die. But if you don’t die, then we win. I don’t know about you, but things have really sucked for me lately,

Read on »

Georgette Heyer Novels and other Regency Historic Reading

Georgette Heyer Regency novels are some of my favorite guilty pleasures. I stumbled across Heyer when in junior high – which must have been about 1981 or so – and I was initially fascinated by the fact that several of her books had female characters that disguised themselves as men. At the time there were

Read on »

Liberals

“Liberals got women the right to vote. Liberals got African-Americans the right to vote. Liberals created Social Security and lifted millions of elderly people out of poverty. Liberals ended segregation. Liberals passed the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act. Liberals created Medicare. Liberals passed the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act. What did

Read on »

On the Bible

“Luckily, I happen to have a Bible laying around this house, because even though I’m not a Christian, I was an English major, and it is important to Know Your Ancient Mythologies if you are reading poetry.” — Amanda Marcotte, Pandagon.net thankyouverymuch.

Read on »

Queer Quotes

Why can’t they have gay people in the army? Personally, I think they are just afraid of a thousand guys with M16s going, “Who’d you call a faggot?” — Jon Stewart

Read on »

The Chaos

by Gerard Nolst Trenité Dearest creature in creation Studying English pronunciation, I will teach you in my verse Sounds like corpse, corps, horse and worse. I will keep you, Susy, busy, Make your head with heat grow dizzy; Tear in eye, your dress you’ll tear; Queer, fair seer, hear my prayer. Pray, console your loving

Read on »

Nature cannot be fooled

Richard Feynman’s famous conclusion to his report on the shuttle Challenger accident, which arose again in the Columbia accident, is “For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for Nature cannot be fooled.” [cribbed from Edward Tufte.] Yeah, no shit. Someone should point this out to Bush, tout de suite.

Read on »

Book Review – The Lost Art of Steam Heat

I checked The Lost Art of Steam Heat out from the library because our house has a steam-heat system and it’s working, but not exactly correctly. We’ve had a repair guy out numerous times, but he hasn’t quite fixed the rather complex system, and I wanted to understand a bit more so I could communicate

Read on »

Book Review – The Boy Detective Fails

Yeah, this book comes with a decoder ring on the back flap. You don’t discover this until a chapter or two into the book when you have to decode a secret message, but I’m telling you right up front because, well, that’s so frackin’ cool. Joe Meno’s The Boy Detective Fails is a loving homage

Read on »

Book Review – Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic

I keep putting off writing a review of Fun Home because I feel a sense of obligation to the book — one so well written deserves a well-written review, and I haven’t had it in me lately to try to write one. Here is my poor attempt to do justice to this fantastic book. Alison

Read on »

Favorite Quotes

Maureen Dowd on Dick Cheney: “In a democracy, when you run a campaign that panders to homophobia by attacking gay marriage and then your lesbian daughter writes a book about politics and decides to have a baby with her partner, you cannot tell Wolf Blitzer he’s “out of line” when he gingerly raises the hypocrisy

Read on »

Song of Ice and Fire to be HBO Mini-Series

According to George R.R. Martin’s blog, and according to Variety: HBO turns ‘Fire’ into fantasy series HBO has acquired the rights to turn George R.R. Martin’s bestselling fantasy series “A Song of Fire & Ice” into a dramatic series to be written and exec produced by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss. “Fire” is the first

Read on »

Water for Elephants

21-year-old Jacob Jankowski is studying veterinary medicine in 1931, in the depths of the Great Depression, when his parents are killed in an auto accident. Jacob discovers they had mortgaged their lives to fund his schooling, and he is now penniless. Reeling from grief, he walks away from his final exams and drops out of

Read on »

What I Read in 2006 (49 Titles)

2006 was the 10th year I’ve kept track of what I’ve read, and eventually a decade retrospective is in order, but not tonight.
This year’s tally of books is roughly what it was last year – 49 titles. With a several of them being silly easy things, of course, because we were quite busy and I haven’t had the time to read that I used to. This year I managed to write a bit about most books and my impressions, which is cool, because I’ve looked at my past lists sometimes drawn a complete blank at the title and wondered what the heck it was about.

Read on »

Book Review – Rough Magicke

Author John Houghton sets his novel Rough Magicke in northwest Indiana, in the fictional county of Annandale originally created by classic Hoosier author Meredith Nicholson in the novel The House of a Thousand Candles – the locale corresponds pretty closely to the city of Culver, Indiana, a town nestled in around Lake Maxinkuckee, south of

Read on »

Book Review: Special Topics in Calamity Physics

Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl This is my favorite of the year, and will probably make the list of of my favorite books ever. I’m not sure I can do it justice in reviewing it, but I hope I can do a bit better than Publishers Weekly, whom I’m going to quote

Read on »

Books I’ve Read Recently

Company: A Novel by Max Barry Amazon Description: “With broad strokes, Barry once again satirizes corporate America in his third caustic novel (after Jennifer Government). This time, he takes aim at the perennial corporate crime of turning people into cogs in a machine. Recent b-school grad Stephen Jones, a fresh-faced new hire at a Seattle-based

Read on »

David Foster Wallace

All the hipsters were reading him, so I actually talked my book group into reading one of his early works – Broom of the System — or as I call it “Broom of the Fucking System.” I actually read the whole thing thinking that sooner or later there actually had to be a plot there,

Read on »

The number 8 rabbit

The white rabbit with the number eight on it from Lost is in Stephen King’s book “On Writing.” I haven’t read a whole lot of Stephen King, so I don’t know if it’s a plot point in one of his fiction novels also.

Read on »

Books I’ve read Recently

Garden Accents: Simple-To-Build Projects to Enhance Your Yard or Garden (How-to Gardening) Quite a few interesting building projects for hardscaping your garden. I read this over while drawing up plans for our flowerbeds. Pit of Vipers (Nancy Drew (All New) Girl Detective) #18 by Carolyn Keene There are 21 books out now in this all

Read on »

Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things

Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things: How to Turn a Penny into a Radio, Make a Flood Alarm with an Aspirin, Change by Cy Tymony ISBN: 0740738593 NON-FICTION – A small guide to how to MacGyvver yourself out of situations using objects you may have with you. I checked the book out from the library, so

Read on »

Short Book Reviews

How Nancy Jackson Married Kate Wilson and Other Tales of Rebellious Girls and Daring Young Women by Mark Twain and John R. Cooley Library Journal: “A dozen minor Twain pieces to show how Twain used some of his slight fictions to idealize his daughters Clara and Suzy Clemens as romantic, rebellious, and daring adolescents in

Read on »

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald I first read this book when I was still a kid — either in junior high or high school, and I don’t remember caring too much for it, and feeling impatient to ge to the end. We read it again for our book club, and I’m very glad

Read on »

More Gatsby

“Self-control!” Repeated Tom incredulously. “I suppose the latest thing is to sit back and let Mr. Nobody from Nowhere make love to your wife. Well, if that’s the idea you can count me out. . . . Nowadays people begin by sneering at family life and family institutions, and next they’ll throw everything overboard and

Read on »

Gatsby Quotes

He smiled understandingly—much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced—or seemed to face—the whole external world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor.

Read on »

Progress Report

So far this year, I’ve read 30 books, and many of them have been pretty light reading. I guess I’m quite a bit behind Bush. At this point, I’ve pretty much abandoned my New Years Reading List and gone off on wild tangents, which seems to be a commentary on my life in general somehow.

Read on »

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists by Gideon Defoe Description from Amazon.com: Not since Moby-Dick… No, not since Treasure Island… Actually, not since Jonah and the Whale has there been a sea saga to rival The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists, featuring the greatest sea-faring hero of all time, the immortal Pirate Captain,

Read on »

On Bullshit

On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt A small, funny book I picked up at the library after the author was interviewed on the Daily Show – it’s a scholarly inquiry on the definition of “bullshit.” From the Amazon.com description: “More pertinent is Frankfurt’s focus on intentions–the practice of bullshit, rather than its end result. Bullshitting,

Read on »

Sundown Towns

Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen I threw in the towel and bailed on reading this book in depth, which I’ve resolved not to feel bad about. I did skim a lot of it though. I’m a HUGE fan of sociologist Loewen’s books, and this one is good, but

Read on »

Quote

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma – which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow

Read on »

Don’t I know you?

Don’t I know you? by Karen Shepard FICTION – A mystery/thriller set in 1976 Manhattan about a woman, Gina Engel, who is murdered in her own apartment and discovered by her 12-year-old son Stephen. He narrates the first part of the story as he deals with his grief and tries to piece together anything he

Read on »

No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide: Behind the Scenes of Our Emerging Surveillance Society By Robert O’Harrow, Jr. NON-FICTION – Washington Post reporter Robert O’Harrow, Jr. delves into the world of data-collection and surveillance, and puts together a frightening and disheartening portrait of who is gathering personal information about you and why. I started to compile a

Read on »

“I’m not a bigot”

Via the Consumerist, this incredibly funny quote: Now, I am NOT trying to bash homosexuals and I am not a bigot; however, I feel homosexuality is morally wrong and should not be “promoted” as what is the norm for society. Shorter: “I am not a basher or a bigot, however, I am a basher and

Read on »

“Cloud Atlas” and “The Whole World Over”

I haven’t much time to write a coherent review of each of these books, so I’m going to crib from Amazon to describe the plots. Sorry for that…. Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell “… Mitchell’s third novel weaves history, science, suspense, humor and pathos through six separate but loosely related narratives…. this latest foray relies

Read on »

Staceyann Chin’s speech/poem at Gay Games VII

A selection from Stacyann Chin’s speech at the Opening Ceremonies of the Gay Games (this was the part I love so much): I don’t know why but the term lesbian just seems so confrontational to me why can’t you people just say you date other people? Again I say nothing tongue and courage tied with

Read on »

Quotes

“We have now sunk to a depth at which restatement of the obvious is the first duty of intelligent men.” — George Orwell

Read on »

English “Non-Errors” Examined

I blogged a link yesterday to a site of “Non-Errors” in English — discussion of some language rules that the site argues are not really valid rules of language today. The link is making the rounds of popular blog sites, which is how I picked up on it. I sent it to Stephanie, who is

Read on »

Mini Book Reviews

I, Robot Isaac Asimov The classic sci-fi set of short stories by Asimov about Robots and their relationship to man. Asmimov sets out the famous “Three Laws of Robotics” that have influenced much science fiction writing since the stories were originally published in the 1940’s in sci-fi magazines, and then collected in this book published

Read on »

Equality

“Equality is not a concept. It’s not something we should be striving for. It’s a necessity. Equality’s like gravity. We need it to stand on this earth as men and women. The misogyny that is in every culture is not a true part of the human condition. It is life out of balance, and that

Read on »

Imagine a World

B Tal captured this photo at the New England Holocaust Memorial. Imagine a World “Ilse, a childhood friend of mine, once found a raspberry in the camp and carried it in her pocket all day to present to me that night on a leaf. Imagine a world in which your entire possession is one raspberry

Read on »

Quotes

“… because we watched a debate from the House of Representatives about the Iraq Resolution, and it did seem like – you ever been to Trafalgar Square, where they have the, uh, speaker’s corner where, like, crazy people get up on a box, and go, “Harrumph! And Roosevelt stole my couch!” You know, that kind

Read on »

Social Networking for Bookworms

The Wall Street Journal writes about a new social networking site called LibraryThing.com — for people to create catalogs of their books. Similar to software like Booxter or Delicious Library, you record all of your books in a cataloging data set. But in this case the database is stored online, and is shared with other

Read on »

A year of reading Proust

Next year, I’m going to read Proust. I’m going to tackle In Search of Lost Time (AKA Remembrance of Things Past, or more precisely “À la recherche du temps perdu”), from beginning to end. I say next year because I’m still working my way though this year’s reading plans. I’m made some progress, especially when

Read on »

Party Arrival Times

My favorite quote from the comments on this discussion about what is the optimal time to arrive at a party: This only works if all guests judge by the same criteria. They do not. In many circles, late arrivers are seen as lazy, irreponsible, disorganized, rude, or to posers or strivers who try to cram

Read on »

A Priceless Quote

Regarding the same-sex marriage ban: “I don’t believe there’s any issue that’s more important than this one,” said Sen. David Vitter, a Louisiana Republican. Note where the guy is from — a state who’s citizens are still displaced all over the country, who had a major U.S. city destroyed last year.

Read on »

Mini Book Reviews

Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her by Melanie Rehak A great exploration of the history of the popular girl detective novels and the women who wrote them. I learned a couple of surprising things — that Nancy Drew was far and away the most popular of the Stratmeyer Syndicate’s kid book

Read on »

blaming mathematics for your inability to add

From the crushworthy site NonSequitur: So while many liberals may perhaps share the satisfaction of having been right about Iraq and Afghanistan from the very beginning, this does not mean (1) that they are gleeful over the damage that has been done to America, and more perniciously, (2) that they brought it about or desired

Read on »

The Bible is Fiction

Ian McKellen, cast in the movie The DaVinci Code, had some choice words about the bible in recent interview: Matt Lauer: “There have been calls from some religious groups, they wanted a disclaimer at the beginning of this movie saying it is fiction because one of the themes in the book really knocks Christianity right

Read on »

idiots rule

“Everything you love, everything meaningful with depth and history, all passionate authentic experiences will be appropriated, mishandled, watered down, cheapened, repackaged, marketed and sold to the people you hate.” — Mr. Jalopy.

Read on »

Alabama needs better sex ed classes. Seriously.

The website goodasyou.com pointed out an anti-gay “sex-ed” (no actual education included) pamphlet distributed by an Alabama Middle School that has a quote that literally made me snort soda out of my nose a few minutes ago. These same sex “unions” cannot provide an adequate means of achieving a genuine physical relationship with another human

Read on »

Books I’ve Read Recently

The Nanny Diaries by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus I enjoyed this light, comic novel as a easy summer reading book. I have to admit being frustrated by the level to which “Nanny” — the young female protagonist — put up with the crap of the Manhattan family that hired her to take care of

Read on »

Favorite Quotes

“Cocaine is a drug whose principle effect is to make assholes feel good about themselves.” — from Kent, in the comments on Ian’s blog.

Read on »

Fame

The time of getting fame for your name on its own is over. Artwork that is only about wanting to be famous will never make you famous. Any fame is a by-product of making something that means something. You don’t go to a restaurant and order a meal because you want to have a shit.

Read on »

Mini Book Reviews

I’m currently making my way through a couple of bigger books — The Watchmen (Absolute Edition) by Alan Moore, and A Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster. But in between I’ve read a couple of shorter, fun books. The World of Kong: A Natural History of Skull Island by Weta Workshop An

Read on »

Books that caught my eye

Stephanie and I went to the bookstore last night so she could use a gift certificate she received, and I wrote down a bunch of interesting books that I intend to either buy, check out from the library, or investigate further at some point in the future. Let me know if you’ve read any of

Read on »

Really?

The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources. — Albert Einstein I’ll have to double-check on that one, because it sounds like one of those quotes that we hope is true, but later find out isn’t.

Read on »

Buffy Quotes

A big fat list I had stashed somewhere on my hard drive, that I just recently unearthed. Heh. It’s not comprehensive; it’s missing the last few years of the show. “Anchovies, anchovies you’re so delicious. I love you more than all the other fishes.” -Dawn Summers Buffy: Fire Bad. Tree Pretty. Buffy: “Can you vague

Read on »

Books to Read Before You Die

The British librarian’s organization — “Museum, Libraries and Archives Council” — has put together a List of Books to Read Before You Die. I have a pretty good start on the list. Of the ones I haven’t read yet, I have four on my bookshelves at home, so I’ll probably get to them someday. To

Read on »

List of Signature Phrases

Wikipedia has a great list of signature phrases — the unique lines associated with real or fictional characters, and they cover a lot of territory. Read it over; it will bring back some memories. # “Aciao good night!” (Aciao bonsoir!) – P.P.D. the puppet in the French satiric show Les Guignols de l’Info, at the

Read on »

Stakeout on Millennium Drive

I hate throwing in the towel on books. I feel guilty if I can’t get through one, and I will struggle to the end of even the most difficult stuff. And I wanted to like Stakeout on Millennium Drive; I really did. It is, after all, a book set in Indianapolis, by a native writer,

Read on »

Photoshop Hacks: Choose Your Own Adventure Novels

My brother Todd had a ton of the Choose Your Own Adventure novels (the early version of video games). Check out Something Awful’s photoshop contest for “Rejected CYOA Books.” My favorites are “Don’t Bother, You Die In Most of the Endings Anyway” and “Everyone Wants to Touch My Giant Snake and Jewels.” Also: “Shrödinger’s Cat.

Read on »

“The Kiterunner” does not contain “pornography”

Some (idiot moron) parents in Lawrence Township schools are objecting to the book “The Kiterunner” being assigned in class, because they claim there is a scene that is “pornographic” in it. The Kiterunner is a story of children living in contemporary Afghanistan, and is a wonderful, amazing book. It is, unfortunately, fairly true to life,

Read on »

Quad Cities Censorship

This is an interesting article in the Quad City Times, about a book called “The Misfits” that was banned at the elementary school level in the Quad Cities. “I knew I had all of those signs of being gay, and I couldn’t make sense of it,” said Howe, who wrote “The Misfits,” a book about

Read on »

Scaling Down

I borrowed the book “Scaling Down” (by Judi Culbertson and Marj Decker) from my girlfriend Stephanie, because we’re both attempting to sort through the things we own and uh, scale down. We’ve got to figure out how we’re going to merge households, and for two people who both own two-story, multi-bedroom homes packed with stuff,

Read on »

Stranger In a Strange Land

This is a book club, book, so of course I have to abide by the first and second rules of book club and not talk about it before we meet. But I have to write about it soon, or I’m going to forget details of what I wanted to say about it. So, book club

Read on »

President Washington Used Electronic Wiretaps

“President Washington, President Lincoln, President Wilson, President Roosevelt have all authorized electronic surveillance on a far broader scale.” — Attorney General Alberto Gonzales while testifying before congress on illegal wiretapping No, I’m not shitting you, he really said that, and you can see the video yourself. Can I also point out that aside from the

Read on »

Superhero Reading List

To my Amazon Wish List, I just added: How To Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion by Daniel H. Wilson The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks Real Ultimate Power: The Official Ninja Book by Robert Hamburger The Government Manual for New Superheroes

Read on »

100 Best First Lines from Novels

According to the American Book Review: 1. Call me Ishmael. —Herman Melville, Moby-Dick (1851) 2. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. —Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813) 3. A screaming comes across the sky. —Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow

Read on »

Corett Scott King Quotes

“I still hear people say that I should not be talking about the rights of lesbian and gay people and I should stick to the issue of racial justice,” she said. “But I hasten to remind them that Martin Luther King Jr. said, ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.’ I appeal to everyone

Read on »

Best Lesbian Erotica 2006 (Best Lesbian Erotica Series)

Best Lesbian Erotica 2006 (Best Lesbian Erotica Series) by Tristan Taormino, Eileen Myles This was better than most lesbian erotica books I’ve read, I have to say. I’m normally not a huge fan of the genre because it’s often so badly written that I can’t suspend my disbelief long enough to go for the ride.

Read on »

What have you given us, Dr. Franklin?

It’s Benjamin Franklin’s 300th birthday. The story goes that, as Franklin left the Constitutional Convention in 1787, he was approached by a Mrs. Powell, who asked him, “What have you given us, Dr. Franklin?” “A republic,” he replied, “if you can keep it.” With Alito, looks like that’s pretty much gone, now.

Read on »

A Feast For Crows: worth the wait

I finished up reading George R. R. Martin’s long-awaited fourth fantasy novel A Feast for Crows today. I’m dying to find out what happens next. The fifth book (A Dance of Dragons) in the “Song of Ice and Fire” series is due out sometime this year, and if it does drop (Martin is notorious for

Read on »

Books I plan to read in 2006

Thirty-eight books that I already own and need to read. I’m setting these aside to pick up and read in 2006. I hope I’ll get through more than just these, but this would make a big dent in my “to read” stacks.

Read on »

A Feast for Crows: starting the book

I started reading one of the books I bought with my Barnes and Noble gift cards, A Feast for Crows this week. It’s the fourth book in the fantasy series “A Song of Ice and Fire” by George R. R. Martin. I really enjoy this series because it turns many of the tired fantasy cliches

Read on »

2006 Library Booksale Schedule

Courtesy my friend Melissa, here’s the schedule for the library sales in 2006. Not that I need any more books than I already have. That has to be one of my New Years Resolutions: no buying books other than for Book Club. Holy crap! They have an online zShop at Amazon.com, too.

Read on »

What I Read in 2005 (51 Titles)

I’m going to change around a bit how I record the books I’ve read. This coming year, I’ll log titles by doing a short blog entry about them, instead of doing a running list as I have in years past.

Read on »

New Yorker Article on P. L. Travers

New Yorker article discusses how much author P. L. Travers dislike the movie version of her Mary Poppins book, even though it made her rich. In examining some details about Travers’ life, it become evident that the movie seems to have an opposite message from the one she may have intended.

Read on »

If you can’t maim them, Auntie Mame them

Mame Dennis: Well, now, uh, read me all the words you don’t understand. Patrick Dennis: Libido, inferiority complex, stinko, blotto, free love, bathtub gin, monkey glands, Karl Marx… is he one of the Marx Brothers? Patrick Dennis: …Neurotic, heterosexual… Mame Dennis: Oh, my my my my, what an eager little mind. [takes the list] Mame

Read on »

Thomas Jefferson

“Bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal laws must protect, and to violate would be oppression.” –Thomas Jefferson: 1st Inaugural, 1801. ME 3:318

Read on »

Time’s 100 Best Novels 1923-present

Bil asked the question: how many of Time’s list of 100 Best Novels have you read? 41 of them. Most of them in high school or college English classes. When I read the list I was disappointed at what was missing and some of the crap they included. These people can’t tell me they actually

Read on »

Cheese, Peas and Chocolate Pudding

Original publication “Cheese, Peas and Chocolate Pudding”, by Betty Van Witsen, Humpty Dumpty’s Magazine, Copyright 1955, Bank Street College of Education. Subsequently published in Believe and Make-Believe (Sheldon Basic Reading Series) When I was in second grade, the following story was in my school reader, (which I’ve since discovered was called “Believe and Make-Believe (Sheldon

Read on »

Phillip Pullman can kick C.S. Lewis’s ass

Reading a BBC News story on Phillip Pullman’s (author of the His Dark Materials series) critique of the coming C. S. Lewis movie and the subject matter of the books in general. I loved the Narnia series as a kid, but they don’t hold up entirely from a discerning adult point of view, for exactly

Read on »

commonplace books

Years and years ago, (1998) I was sitting around reading my copy of Benet’s Readers Encyclopedia, which is a somewhat obscure reference book. I came across a passage about “commonplace books” which described them as a type of journal from the 1800s where people would collect scraps of poetry, ideas and their own writing along

Read on »

Banned Books Week

Oops, I forgot to mention at the beginning of the week that this is Banned Books Week. Go check out a challenged or banned book from your local library and celebrate freedom from censorship. Also be sure to stand up against book banning. The American Library Association has a list of other great things you

Read on »

Dumbledore is Not Dead

Some good news: Dumbledore is not dead, according to this site. Read their analysis of the clues hidden in the books to find out why they believe this. It’s been my belief all along, mainly because of Fawkes, the Phoenix, but I didn’t reason it out the way these guys did. Their explanations make a

Read on »

The Long Tail

[Navigated to by way of Steven Johnson’s Blog. Johnson is the author of Everything Bad Is Good for You: How Today’s Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter which I read recently.] Quoting from Wikipedia: The phrase The Long Tail, as a proper noun, was first coined by Chris Anderson. Beginning in a series of

Read on »

My Library

I’m started cataloging my library using Booxter software, by Deep Prose. Since 1997, I’ve kept lists of all the books I’ve read, but I’ve never been good at keeping track of the books I actually own and haven’t yet read, or books that I want to purchase. And for insurance reasons, I should have an

Read on »

A list of Post-Modern novels

A MetaFilter list of suggested “sprawling post-modern novels”. Off the top of my head, I have these that are on their list. delillo’s underworld infinite jest house of leaves Umberto Eco’s Foucault’s Pendulum Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children and Ground Beneath Her Feet Death on the Installment Plan by Celine Neal Stephenson – Cryptonomicon The Tin Drum

Read on »

Secret Societies

I’m in the middle of reading: Secret Societies Handbook by Michael Bradley A History of Secret Societies by Arkon Daraul And I’m fascinated, especially by the Handbook, because it lists the Bilderberg Group, the Club of Rome and the Council on Foreign Relations; all are real groups that seem to have major influence on world

Read on »

Mini review: The Radioactive Boy Scout

The Radioactive Boy Scout: The Frightening True Story of a Whiz Kid and His Homemade Nuclear Reactor by Ken Silverstein In 1997, teenage Boy Scout David Hahn, who had been engaging in home-brewed science experiments for years in his parent’s backyard in Detroit, Michigan, built himself a functioning model nuclear reactor in his mother’s garden

Read on »

Mini Reviews

I’ve been meaning to write reviews for all these things for a while, but I’ve been so busy I haven’t had time. So here are my mini reviews, because I can’t seem to keep up with everything. All the President’s Men I watched this movie for the first time this past weekend, and it was

Read on »

Harry Potter book covers from different countries

The New York Times has a slideshow of the release of Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince around the world, and when you view it, it becomes apparent that different countries have quite different book covers for the book. The Australian cover is the one we found online the other day at a rumor

Read on »

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

I finished reading the new Harry Potter book last night. Throughout the book I had a notion in my head of the answers to two of the mysteries; who the half-blood prince is, and who dies in the book (don’t yell at me about spoilers; the death is commonly known!).

Read on »

Stranger Things Happen

I’ve had the Kelly Link short story collection “Stranger Things Happen” on my to-buy list for quite some time, and for one reason or another have never gotten around to purchasing it. Now she’s written another short story collection (Magic for Beginners), and to help promote it, has made the previous book available for free

Read on »

Tagged: About books

Scott tagged me with this book meme that’s going around, and now I have to tag others. 1. Estimate the total number of books you’ve owned in your life. I *think* I have about 3,000 books in my current library. Probably double that for what I’ve owned over my lifetime. I took a picture of

Read on »

Orson Scott Card

Aw, man. I suspected when we were reading Ender’s Game for my book club that mormon Orson Scott Card was a conservative nutjob. Turns out he is indeed: he actually writes an article attempting to rehabilitate the Sith and the dark side, claiming that the Jedis are the force of evil, not Darth Vader. That

Read on »

Stuff I’ve Read Lately

The Broom of the System David Foster Wallace I read this for my book group, so I’m not going say much about it before we meet to talk about it, because the first rule of book group is “don’t talk about the book before book group.” But as far as David Foster Wallace goes, I

Read on »

Favorite Literary Characters

The Independent put together a list of well-known literati’s picks for their favorite literary characters. I’m sure I’ll think of more later, but here are mine, off the top of my head: 1. Anne Elliot, from Jane Austen’s Persuasion. 2. Rosalind, from Shakespeare’s As You Like It. 3. Auntie Mame, from Patrick Dennis’ Auntie Mame

Read on »

Trivial Pursuit: Book Lover’s Edition

The Book Lover’s Edition is played very similarly to the regular editions of Trivial Pursuit; the goal is to collect pieces of pie representing different categories of questions, and then to land directly on the center of the board to answer a final question in the category chosen for you by your opponents. Unlike other

Read on »

Speaking of Big Things: Giant Book

I came across this link on Amazon.com today… a giant 5×7 foot book about the country of Bhutan, published by Friendly Planet, a not-for-profit organization. The giant photographic book is according to Guinness World Records the largest published book in the world. This edition is limited to 500 published copies, and each copy is built

Read on »

One Book, One City

One Book, One City is an annual city-wide book discussion program organized by the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library and the City of Indianapolis. The goal is to promote a city zeitgeist of reading and discussion by picking an annual book selection from a long list of titles suggested by Indianapolis residents. In 2004, the program’s

Read on »

How to Kill A Mockingbird: A Book Report

A super cool Flash book report on the book How To Kill A Mockingbird. I didn’t remember so many pirates or sharks or explosions in the book though. I’ll have to read it again. Those are some skilled pirates — flinging bears from the backs of flaming sharks.

Read on »

Democracy by Langston Hughes

Democracy will not come Today, this year Nor ever Through compromise and fear. I have as much right As the other fellow has To stand On my two feet And own the land. I tire so of hearing people say, Let things take their course. Tomorrow is another day. I do not need my freedom

Read on »

women’s book club book

Second Glance is the book our women’s book club chose for August. My co-worker’s book club is still deciding on what book to read for July going to read In Cold Blood by Truman Capote.

Read on »

Gratuitous Wonder Woman linkage

For no real reason, except that I happened to click on it on someone else’s site, a really nice photo of Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman. Which is coming out on DVD on June 29th, BTW. You’ll want to pre-order that right away. I did.

Read on »

Weekend Update 2004-03-29

So I spent the whole weekend moving at a leisurely pace, which was very refreshing after months of whirlwind activity. Friday night was Girl’s Game Night at Vic’s/Outword Bound, which is always very fun. I bought The Truth About Jane and Tipping the Velvet on DVD from Outword Bound, which now has an online store,

Read on »

Reading, TV….

I finished The Eyre Affair on Sunday, and last night wrapped up The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, which I’m reading for one of my book clubs. Both are highly recommended.

Read on »

Granta and the New York Times Review of Books

Granta and the New York Review of Books are two publications that I’ve always wanted to subscribe to, but could never quite find the money for in my budget. Now they’re free as a bonus with my subscription to Salon Magazine. That’s so cool. I love Salon and read it everyday anyway… all the bonuses

Read on »

Naomi Wolf and sexual harrassment

I’ve read a great deal from others about Naomi Wolf and her revelation that while at school she had been sexually harrassed by famed professor Harold Bloom, but I had not, until today, read the story in her own words.

Read on »

treppenwitz

Treppenwitz, AKA “L’esprit de l’escalier” Literally, ‘the wisdom of the stairs’. The striking reply that crosses one’s mind belatedly when already leaving, on the stairs. People are often angry because they did not have the fitting answer directly during a conversation. The term is old, but it was made popular by W. Lewis Hertslet who

Read on »

The Laws of Physics Don’t Apply to Me

College Application essay by Hugh Gallagher, author of Teeth: 3A. ESSAY: IN ORDER FOR THE ADMISSIONS STAFF OF OUR COLLEGE TO GET TO KNOW YOU, THE APPLICANT, BETTER, WE ASK THAT YOU ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTION: ARE THERE ANY SIGNIFICANT EXPERIENCES YOU HAVE HAD, OR ACCOMPLISHMENTS YOU HAVE REALIZED, THAT HAVE HELPED TO DEFINE YOU

Read on »

Weekend Update 2004-01-26

I finished sanding the edges of the floor in the living room, and did the full-scale cleanup of sawdust required. I hoped that I’d have enough time to start staining the floors, but that was overly ambitious. The edger sander was really hard to control — I was exhausted when I finished Saturday, and today

Read on »

Northanger Abbey, not Mansfield Park

I’m confusing my Austen novels. It was Catherine and Henry that had the conversation about hyacinths, not Fanny and Edmund. Sad when that happens. Now I have to go back and read them again. “But now you love a hyacinth. So much the better. You have gained a new source of enjoyment, and it is

Read on »

Weekend Update 2004-01-06

Over the long New Years weekend, my friend Cate, who was in from Germany, came over and we went to Dan and Doug’s New Years party (photos soon!) along with Kathy and had a good time. Cate and I went to the Catholic supply store downtown and got religious medals (I know, I know, I

Read on »

Village Voice: Our 25 Favorite Books of 2003

The Village Voice Actress in the House By Joseph McElroy OVER OK, 432 PP., $26.95 Buy this book It begins with a stage-slap, witnessed by a man named Daley, then spirals into cul-de-sacs of memory, ruminations on love and aging, ever returning to the linear narrative–the coupling of the actress and the man–before setting out

Read on »

Newbery Medal Winners

The Newbery Medal was named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. 2005 — Kira-Kira by Cynthia Kadohata 2004 — The Tale of Despereaux:

Read on »

New Favorite Quote

Again from the Television Without Pity recap of Carnivale, this time from the season finale: “Libby crosses the carnival to find Sofie hanging out by a tent, and they both kick off their date by lighting cigarettes. Flick…ahh. Then they stare deep into each other’s eyes and kiss. I think it’s kind of sad that

Read on »

Narnia

They’re doing a film version of the Chronicles of Narnia. That’s so cool. I can’t wait. I love these books when I was a kid, and I bought the boxed set a few years back and re-read them. The film version is being done by Peter Jackson, the producer of the Lord of the Rings,

Read on »

Neil Gaiman

I read my first Neil Gaiman book, Neverwhere, the other day, and I’m hopelessly addicted and can’t believe I never read any of his work before. I was really delighted to discover a link on Wil Wheaton’s blog, which I read every day, to Neil Gaiman’s blog, which I will be reading every day as

Read on »

Mad Tea Party

From Alice in Wonderland: The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?” “Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice. “I’m glad they’ve begun asking riddles.–I believe I can guess that,” she added aloud. “Do you mean that you think

Read on »

Alanis: Irony Defined.

Irony defined — by the British, of course, because they did invent the language after all. I’m posting this here because I’m resisting the temptation to send it directly to people. Favorite part so far: “every one of us, I’d guess, has a friend who engages in an argument, waits patiently until you’ve said something

Read on »

Good vs. Evil

“And of course, he chose evil. I guess you can’t blame him, that’s where all the money and glamour is. The good side just has a bunch of broke, ignored, frustrated do-gooders. Evil has the top shelf gin and those nice thick ice cubes that keep the drink cold for as long as it takes.

Read on »

Glass Dog

I assume you’re looking for some hot little thing in a Catholic schoolgirl uniform-type with the freckles and the button nose and the big tits, like? Some sort of virgin-whore who’s wild in the sack and talks dirty only when she’s whispering in your ear? Uhhhhhh, she’s right over there. Pass her a note, purse

Read on »

Booker Prize Winners

The Booker Prize, judged in England, is awarded to the best novel written in English by a citizen of the UK, the Commonwealth, Eire, Pakistan, or South Africa, and has been awarded since 1969.

Read on »

‘Twas the Night Before Christmas: Internet Version

Author Unknown ‘Twas the night before Christmas, and throughout the net, not a modem was chirping; (It wasn’t mail-hour yet). The peripherals down and backed up with care, In hopes that St. Echo soon would be there. The grad students home all snug in their beds, with hi-res dreams abuzz in their heads. We Sysops

Read on »

The Net Before Christmas

by Jim Trudeau & Jay Trudeau (1991) ‘Twas the night before Christmas and all through the nets Not a mousie was stirring, not even the pets. The floppies were stacked by the modem with care In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there. The files were nestled all snug in a folder The screen

Read on »

‘Twas The Night Before Techmas

‘Twas the nocturnal segment of the diurnal period preceding the annual Yuletide celebration, and throughout our place of residence, kinetic activity was not in evidence among the possessors of this potential, including that species of domestic rodent known as Mus musculus.

Read on »

The Second Coming — W. B Yeats

From the Book: The Collected Poems of William Butler Yeats TURNING and turning in the widening gyre The falcon cannot hear the falconer; Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world, The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere The ceremony of innocence is drowned; The best lack all conviction,

Read on »

Indigo Girls

New favorite lyric: “You are so baroque; all of those words, just to tell me no.” — from”Yield”, Become You, the Indigo Girls

Read on »

Banned Books Links

Banned Books Week Banned Books Week is the national book community’s annual celebration of the freedom to read. Hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. Banned Books Week is held annually on the second to

Read on »

Rosie Comes Out

“They’re saying I’m not gay enough. They say I lied because I said I love Tom Cruise. I do love Tom Cruise. What do I have to do, have sex with Angelina Jolie on TV?” — Rosie O’Donnell, lashing out at people who quibble with her coming-out technique at a benefit for ovarian cancer in

Read on »

Revolutionary Girl Utena

An awesome Japanese comic book turned TV series about a cross-dressing young girl, Utena Tenjou, who is rescued by a prince, and as a result, decides to become a prince herself.

Read on »

Vintage International Catalog

Vintage International: Devoted to publishing the best writing of the twentieth century from the world over, Vintage International offers both classic and contemporary fiction and literary nonfiction in elegant paperback editions. Abe, Kobo. Ark Sakura Abe, Kobo. Kangaroo Notebook Abe, Kobo. Woman in the Dunes Aksyonov, Vassily. Generations of Winter Amis, Martin. Dead Babies Amis,

Read on »

Read the book before the movie

Favorite thing that happened yesterday: I was watching Entertainment Tonight, where they were covering the premiere of Harry Potter in England, and they interviewed all the celebrities going to see the movie, including Cher. And they asked them “Are you excited about the premiere of the movie?” And every one of the had to admit

Read on »

Garrison Kellior: A true friend

Garrison Kellior: A true friend is someone you could call up and say, “I’m a wreck and I’m coming over and staying with you for a couple days.” Or you could say, “I’m sorry to call you at 3 a.m. but I’m sitting in a truck stop confused and missing my pants and need you

Read on »

honesty is the best policy

I like the phrase “honesty is the best policy.” It sort of implies that you’ve tried other policies, and realized they didn’t work. It’s not one of those “because I said so” kind of instructions. It’s like the voice of experience talking. Sort of : “I’ve been a big liar, but it really wasn’t all

Read on »

Fake Amazon Book

And another Fake (or at least extremely funny) Amazon book: How to Good-Bye Depression : If You Constrict Anus 100 Times Everyday. Malarkey? or Effective Way?

Read on »

My Birthday

Dan and Doug took me out to dinner, and gave me North By Northwest and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and My sister gave me a fondue pot, ice crusher, and goth chick Barbie. So my birthday turned out pretty damned cool. Fake book on Amazon: American Foreign Policy by G. W. Bush Fake reviewers on

Read on »

new house

Picked up the keys to my new house today. Went in, figured out how the security alarm works (No, I ain’t gonna tell *you*) and generally wandered around looking in the fridge, oven and closets. Then I decided to look in the cellar and see what was down there. So I hoisted up the door

Read on »

Dr. Seuss Explains Computers

Author Unknown If a packet hits a pocket on a socket on a port, and the bus is interrupted as a very last resort, and the address of the memory makes your floppy disk abort, then the socket packet pocket has an error to report. If your cursor finds a menu item followed by a

Read on »

Things I said…

I don’t need clones. You have to feed them. What I need is a doppelganger. You can’t straddle the fence without bruising your genitalia. On George W. Bush: I don’t want a president who’s done more drugs than me. On President G. W. Bush: At the very least, I can say I’m smarter than the

Read on »

The Wisdom Of Supermodels

Note: Most of these quotes have been debunked on Snopes.com as untrue. ON COURAGE: "They were doing a full back shot of me in a swimsuit and I thought, ‘Oh my God, I have to be so brave. See, every woman hates herself from behind.’" -Cindy Crawford ON POVERTY: "Everyone should have enough money to

Read on »

One-Liners From Your Favorite Comics

A lady came up to me on the street and pointed at my suede jacket. ‘You know a cow was murdered for that jacket?’ she sneered. I replied in a psychotic tone, ‘I didn’t know there were any witnesses. Now I’ll have to kill you too. – Jake Johansen A study in the Washington Post

Read on »

Random House Modern Library Catalog

“The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennet Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern

Read on »

The Library of America

History and Mission Statement (from LOA web site, 3/99): “The Library of America was founded in 1979 to undertake a historic endeavor: to help preserve the nation’s cultural heritage by publishing America’s best and most significant writing in durable and authoritative editions.” “The idea for The Library of America was first discussed some thirty years

Read on »

Everyman’s Library

“Everyman’s Library, founded in 1906 and relaunched in 1991 [by Alfred E. Knopf, a division of Random House], aims to offer the most complete library in the English language of the world’s classics. Each volume is printed in a classic typeface on acid-free, cream-wove paper with a sewn full cloth binding.” This is the March

Read on »

Two Digits for a Date

Author Unknown (sung to the tune of "Gilligan’s Island", more or less) Just sit right back and you’ll hear a tale Of the doom that is our fate. That started when programmers used Two digits for a date… two digits for a date. Main memory was much smaller then; Hard disks were smaller, too. "Four

Read on »

Writer’s Paradise

Author Unknown A writer dies and due to a bureaucratic snafu in the the afterworld, she is allowed to choose her own fate: heaven or hell for all eternity. Being a very shrewd dead person, she asks St. Peter for a tour of both. The first stop is hell where she sees rows and rows

Read on »

Jean-Paul Sartre’s Cooking Diary

Author Unknown October 3 Spoke with Camus today about my cookbook. Though he has never actually eaten, he gave me much encouragement. I rushed home immediately to begin work. How excited I am! I have begun my formula for a Denver omelet. October 4 Still working on the omelet. There have been stumbling blocks. I

Read on »

Dr. Seuss Books that Were Rejected by His Publisher

Author Unknown How the Grinch Stole Columbus Day Marvin K. Mooney, Get the F*ck Out! The Cat in the Microwave Herbert the Pervert Likes Sherbert Your Colon Can Moo-Can You? The Fox in Detox The Grinch’s Ten Inches One Bitch, Two Bitch, Dead Bitch, Blue Bitch Zippy the Gerbil My Pocket Rocket Needs a Socket

Read on »

Very Short Books

Author Unknown A Guide to Arab Democracies A Journey through the Mind of Dennis Rodman Al Gore: The Wild Years Amelia Earhart’s Guide to the Pacific Ocean America’s Most Popular Lawyers

Read on »

Children’s Books You’ll Never See

These were from a Washington Post contest: "You Were an Accident" (Jean Sorensen, Herndon; Barry Blyveis, Columbia) "Strangers Have the Best Candy" (Stephen Dudzik, Silver Spring) "The Little Sissy Who Snitched" (Tom Witte, Gaithersburg) "Some Kittens Can Fly!" (David Genser, Arlington)

Read on »

Funny Quotes

You coveteth my ice cream bar, but you cannot have it. I have had this ice cream bar since I was a child.
— Ren, from Ren and Stimpy

Read on »

Quayle Quotes

Recently, Dan Quayle announced his intentions to run for President of the U.S. in 2000. Since many younger voters may not have been watching the news when these were said the first time, we provide you with this list of famous Quayle quotes.

Read on »

Random House Modern Library Readers’ 100 Best Novels

In response to their list of 100 best novels, the Modern library let the readers respond with their favorite books. This list was derived from an online user poll conducted on the Modern Library web site from July 20 to October 20, 1998, during which 217,520 votes were cast. **Note from Steph: Consider the first

Read on »

Random House Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels

In 1998 the Modern Library, a division of Random House, New York, released this list of ‘the 100 best novels written in the English language and published since 1900.’ The jurors were Daniel J. Boorstin, A.S. Byatt, Christopher Cerf, Shelby Foote, Vartan Gregorian, Edmund Morris, John Richardson, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., William Styron, and Gore Vidal.

Read on »

Inspirational Quotes

g’nothi s’auton – Know thy self — inscription on the wall of the temple at Delphi You don’t drown by falling in water. You drown by staying there. — Robert Allen If at first you don’t succeed, you are running about average. — M. H. Anderson Live, live, live! Life is a banquet, and most

Read on »

On the Subject of Love

There is a Law that man should love his neighbor as himself. In a few years it should be as natural to mankind as breathing or the upright gait; but if he does not learn it he must perish.
— Alfred Adler

Read on »

Seuss on Clinton – extended remix

If Dr. Seuss were President Clinton’s lawyer, his deposition might have read something like this. I did not do it in a car I did not do it in a bar I did not do it in the dark I did not do it in the park I did not do it on a date

Read on »

Down South Valentine

author unknown Kudzu is green, my dog’s name is Blue And I’m so lucky to have a sweet thang like you. Yore hair is like cornsilk A-flapping in the breeze. Softer than Blue’s And without all them fleas. You move like the bass, Which excite me in May. You ain’t got no scales But I

Read on »

Clone of My Own (Song Parody)

The first verse and chorus are by science fiction writer Randall Garrett. The other verses are by Isaac Asimov. This parody is to be sung to the tune of Home on the Range. Oh, give me a clone Of my own flesh and bone With its Y-chromosome changed to X And when it is grown

Read on »

Ode To The Malty Brew

Without question, the greatest invention in the history of mankind is beer. Oh, I grant you that the wheel was also a fine invention, but the wheel does not go nearly as well with pizza. –Dave Barry Not all chemicals are bad. Without chemicals such as hydrogen and oxygen, for example, there would be no

Read on »

Subject: Re: The Vicarious Thrill Is Gone…

A funny post reprinted from the rec.arts.comics.misc newsgroup: From: slieber@compuserve.com (Steve Lieber) Newsgroups: rec.arts.comics.misc fiction, for me, provides a vicarious thrill. I assume the mantle of super-human being and in my mind i fly with the heros. but recently in a main stream comic book it is made all too clear that two of the

Read on »