Posts Tagged: books

This is why I no longer read anything from DC Comics

This is a scene from the brand-new video game Batman Arkham Knight, in which Batgirl (Barbara Gordon), after she has been injured and is in a wheelchair, is held captive under the control of the Joker, and is made to kill herself in front of Batman. The scene is “Fake” in that she’s “not really

Read on »

2015-03-15 Recently Read

Cool stuff I’ve read recently. Andrew Keir: Split ink Fountain Printing ypically when printing, a single colour only is used in each ink fountain (pictures to follow), and while gradients can be printed using modern process colour printing – the standard mix of cyan, magenta, yellow and black found in your average home/office printer –

Read on »

The Naming of Cats

by T. S. Eliot The Naming of Cats is a difficult matter, It isn’t just one of your holiday games; You may think at first I’m as mad as a hatter When I tell you, a cat must have THREE DIFFERENT NAMES. First of all, there’s the name that the family use daily, Such as

Read on »

100 novels everyone should read – Telegraph

Another “books you should read” list, this time from the telegraph. The one’s I’ve read are crossed off. This is actually a pretty good list – mostly classics, and not a single Ayn Rand title on it. Source: Telegraph “100 novels everyone should read” The best novels of all time from Tolkien to Proust and

Read on »

East of the Sun and West of the Moon

Wikipedia: “East of the Sun and West of the Moon” is a Norwegian folk tale. The White Bear approaches a poor peasant and asks if he will give him his youngest daughter; in return, he will make the man rich. The girl is reluctant, so the peasant asks the bear to return, and persuades her

Read on »

Read 26 Indy Reading Challenge for 2014

Early in January of 2014, Indy Star Reporter Michael Anthony Adams issued a challenge to Indiana residents for the new year: New Year’s resolutions are rarely acted on. I’m guilty of it, and you’re guilty of it. The trick is to have support, which is exactly what #Read26Indy is. But instead of having a few

Read on »

A Brave and Startling Truth – Maya Angelou

NY Times: Maya Angelou, Lyrical Witness of the Jim Crow South, Dies at 86 We, this people, on a small and lonely planet Traveling through casual space Past aloof stars, across the way of indifferent suns To a destination where all signs tell us It is possible and imperative that we learn A brave and

Read on »

Writing off Jennifer Weiner

I don’t know how it’s possible, but after reading this New Yorker profile “Written Off” by Rebecca Mead, I love Jennifer Weiner more than I did before reading it, although it’s widely being described as “a take-down” piece. The profile starts out fine, but about half-way through, the paragraph that starts “Weiner has also taken

Read on »

My DC Comics Pull List Purge

The only comment that DC Comics has made so far about the epic fuck-up that they have made with Batwoman and refusing to allow her to be married [Batwoman writers leave DC Comics over ban on same-sex marriage] is this: “As acknowledged by the creators involved, the editorial differences with the writers of BATWOMAN had

Read on »

Batwoman writers leave DC Comics over ban on same-sex marriage

J.H. Williams III and Haden Blackman — longtime writers of the Batwoman comic book — are leaving DC Comics over a dispute about editorial changes to their planned story lines, including being forbidden to show the main character marrying her same-sex partner. Cross-posted by the authors to both author sites: Unfortunately, in recent months, DC

Read on »

Supergirl First

The case for why DC should tackle a Supergirl movie before a Wonder Woman movie. I wrote a little bit a few weeks ago about the importance of getting the Wonder Woman storyline right when she is written in comics, books, television and movies. If I had a huge ego, I’d say the folks at

Read on »

Favorite Quotes – Mario Savio

There is a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part. You can’t even passively take part! And you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to

Read on »

Favorite Quotes: White Dude Mating Calls

It’s a tedious way of saying “Don’t make me feel bad for being an asshole”, which seems to be the mating call of a whole lot of white dudes. — from Women in Secularism 2: Breaking News: Even at WiS, we have to defend the purpose of WiS!

Read on »

Nancy Drew “Girl Detective” T-shirt

I’ve loved Nancy Drew since I was a kid, and I had a cool shirt with Pamela Sue Martin’s face on in when I was in elementary school. I always wished I had one with the silhouette on it, so I made one for myself. And you, if you want to buy one. They’re for

Read on »

State of Wonder by Ann Patchett

December’s book club book was State of Wonder and I managed to get it read this time. (It’s been hit-or-miss the last several book club meetings because I’ve been doing my own writing or reading other books or *ahem* reading tons of fan fiction.) The synopsis — which I usually tend to steal from somewhere

Read on »

Word Count for Famous Novels (organized)

Word count for famous novels, in ascending order by number of words. Based on this list compiled by Nicole Humphrey Cook. (Thanks Nicole, and sorry for stealing; I wanted to see the list in order.) For average word counts based on genre, see this handy reference. Also, here’s another list I may swipe and add

Read on »

A Song of Ice and Fire

The HBO series A Game of Thrones starts tonight, and author George R. R. Martin responds on his blog to the off-base New York Times article by Ginia Bellafante claiming that the fantasy genre of literature is “boy fiction” and that his series attracts women by spicing up his novels with graphic sex. As he

Read on »

Amber Benson’ Death’s Daughter Book Contest

I should probably not add competitors to my own contest entry, but if you’re at all a fan of Amber Benson’s Death’s Daughter series, the third book in the series ( Serpent’s Storm ) is coming out in the next few days, and you can win a copy of it in a contest at Bitten

Read on »

Another thing I love about fanfiction.net

The site has great mobile stylesheets You can read on your mobile device, which is why I was the only blissfully happy person standing amidst a crowd of very disgruntled people for an hour and a half in the security line at La Guardia. So yes, I was basically reading what amounts to very light

Read on »

Knitting books

Here are a couple of books we’re picking up for future projects. The Ohio Knitting Mills Knitting Book: 26 Patterns Celebrating Four Decades of American Sweater Style Cowl Girls: The Neck’s Big Thing to Knit And this is one we’re considering getting sometime soon. More Last-Minute Knitted Gifts

Read on »

Stuff I’ve added to my “to read” list

Charlie Chan: The Untold Story of the Honorable Detective and his Rendezvous with American History Wittgenstein’s Mistress You Lost Me There Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life UPDATE: I never acquired the first and second. I read the third book, and own the fourth but haven’t read it yet.

Read on »

links for 2010-04-05

The cult of busy « Scott Berkun I deliberately try not to fill my calendar. I choose not to say Yes to everything. For to do so would make me too busy, and I think, less effective at what my goals are. I always want to have some margin of my time in reserve, time

Read on »

links for 2010-02-20

Designing with Progressive Enhancement: Building the web that works for everyone. By Filament Group: Todd Parker, Patty Toland, Scott Jehl, Maggie Costello Wachs Designing with Progressive Enhancement is a practical guide that both explains the principles and benefits of progressive enhancement, and explores detailed examples to teach you how, where, and when to implement specific

Read on »

links for 2010-01-21

The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House What follows is a brief discussion of Audre Lorde's often-quoted statement, "The master's tools will never dismantle the master's house." (tags: feminism Lorde ideas) Hej Cyklist! Copenhagen Has a New Bike-friendly Feature – GOOD Blog – GOOD Copenhagen installs food rests for cyclists stopped at lights.

Read on »

Richard Dawkins

I went with our friend Mike down to Bloomington to visit our friend Joe and to see Richard Dawkins speak at the IU auditorium last night. He was there to read from and discuss his newest book The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution. I don’t have the book and haven’t read it,

Read on »

links for 2009-10-09

atypically.knit – Hogwarts house scarves I made up my own pattern for mine and it came out well, but these are more polished that mind and I think I'll make one like this, too. (tags: knitting HarryPotter scarf) Yarn, Patterns, Knitting and Crocheting (tags: knitting catalog shop supplies) One Family’s Roots, a Nation’s History –

Read on »

5th Sentence, recurrent

I’ve done this meme a half-dozen times before, but it’s always different because the books is never the same. Rules for this Experiment: Grab the book nearest you. Right now. Turn to page 56. Find the fifth sentence. Post that sentence along with these instructions. “Here is Queen Victoria photographed in 1893 by George W.

Read on »

Project Fill-in-the-Gaps

Project Fill-in-the-Gaps created by Moonrat on her blog Editorial Ass: fill in the gaps in your reading lists of classics and contemporary fiction. Make a list of 100 titles, give yourself 5 years to complete reading the list, and give yourself 25% “accident forgiveness” – consider the task accomplished if you achieve 75 titles in

Read on »

Books I’ve Read – First quarter 2009

Wow, I’ve done horribly at documenting my reading for this year. Maybe I need to just give up trying to do posts for every book and just aggregate them into 1 post each quarter. Here’s what I’ve read in the first quarter of 2009: D’Aulaires’ Book of Norse Myths by Ingri D’Aulaire I loved D’Aulaires’

Read on »

Books I Read in 2008

It’s my 12th Annual end of the year reading recap. Grand total: 30 books. I don’t think that’s my lowest total, but it’s no 98 titles like in 1997. And boy, oh boy did I hit the genre fiction this year. It did help to have lots of fun light reading while all the wedding

Read on »

Books I’ve Read – November and December 2008

A Grave Talent (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King To Play The Fool (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King With Child (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King Earlier this year, I read the fourth and fifth books in the Kate Martinelli Series. This time I circled back around and read the first

Read on »

Recently Acquired Books

Books I just picked up from the book store: Full Frontal Feminism: A Young Woman’s Guide to Why Feminism Matters by Jessica Valenti Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Read on »

Buy a book this weekend

Editorial Ass has some good advice for those in the book publishing industry. Since I’m one of those people, and I’m married to one, and most of my friends have something to do with publishing, I’m going to quote quite a bit of this blog post: Let’s talk a little bit about what happened in

Read on »

Words that end in “-ist” for a thousand, Alex

In creating my current “recently read” list today, I noticed an oddity in my reading choices… The Archivist: A Novel by Martha Cooley The Egyptologist: A Novel by Arthur Phillips Here Lies the Librarian by Richard Peck Maps and Legends by Michael Chabon The Fencing Master by Arturo Perez-Reverte Previously, my reading list included The

Read on »

Book Meme: What I’ve Read

(via Publishing Careers) The National Endowment for the Arts has an initiative you may have heard of called the Big Read. According to the website, its purpose is to “restore reading to the center of American culture.” They estimate that the average adult has only read 6 of the top 100 books they’ve printed. Here’s

Read on »

Book Review Catch-Up – Spring 2008

Boy, am I behind on recording what I’ve read. I’ve had this post in progress forever trying to summarize some of these books, and I kept tacking new titles onto the end. I finally stole enough free time to get it finished. The Geographer’s Library by Jon Fasman A literary history suspense novel, along the

Read on »

links for 2008-03-14

» wallpapers (tags: wallpaper) David Lanham : Hi Gloss (tags: wallpapers) Tubbypaws – papercraft ceiling cat! This is why I love the internets and the people that use them. People are awesome. (tags: papercraft lolcats) YouTube – Mr. Boddy Is Dead Yes, he is. And it’s your job to find who killed him. (tags: clue

Read on »

Laser Eye Surgery: Getting my eyeballs replaced

As someone at work put it. I’m getting laser surgery (specifically PKR) done on my eyes tomorrow by Dr. Waltz of TLC of Indianapolis. I’m doing my traditional “Stress relief by just not thinking about it” form of denial, so I don’t freak out. It couldn’t possibly be worse than the surgeries I’ve already had.

Read on »

Books I Got for Christmas 2007

Part of the awesome loot I got this holiday season from my family. The Daring Book for Girls by Andrea J. Buchanan and Miriam Peskowitz The Best of MAKE Magazine by Mark Frauenfelder and Gareth Branwyn Guerrilla Gardening: A Manualfesto by David Tracey Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight, Volume 1: The Long Way Home

Read on »

Spychips by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre

Recent reading: Spychips: How Major Corporations and Government Plan to Track Your Every Purchase and Watch Your Every Move by Katherine Albrecht and Liz McIntyre From the Electronic Frontier Foundation: Radio-frequency identification (RFID) “tags” are small wireless devices that emit unique identifiers when interrogated by RFID readers or sensors. Today, both government and the private

Read on »

Books, Books, Books

This past weekend, Stephanie and I went to my company’s warehouse employee book sale. This is where they lay out all the returned stock from bookstores and let us purchase it at a steep discount, which means that it doesn’t need to get recycled or trashed. It’s one of the great perks of my job

Read on »

Twilight

After complaining that I’m frustrated by my start and stop reading lately, I sat down with our next book club selection, Twilight, and finished it in less that 24 hours. Abiding by the first rule of book club, I won’t discuss the book, but obviously I blazed through it. (it’s about vampires, and I liked

Read on »

Recent Reading

It was about this time last year that I got behind in reviewing what I had read recently and gave up and simply posted a list of recent reads. Must be the time of year. I’ve definitely been having trouble getting through any book; I have tons of things half read, and I’m very frustrated

Read on »

J.K. Rowling: Dumbledore was gay.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald: Harry Potter fans, the rumours are true: Albus Dumbledore, master wizard and Headmaster of Hogwarts, is gay. JK Rowling, author of the mega-selling fantasy series, outed the beloved character today while appearing before a full house at Carnegie Hall in New York. After reading briefly from the final book,

Read on »

kerouac

Louis Menand in the New Yorker, on kerouac… Kerouac credited the inspiration for the scroll to Cassady–specifically, to a long letter, supposedly around thirteen thousand words, that Cassady wrote over several days (he was on speed) in December, 1950. This is known as the “Joan letter,” because its ostensible subject is a girlfriend of Cassady’s

Read on »

Everything is Miscellaneous

I mentioned the book Everything is Miscellaneous a few posts back on my list of recent reads, but I wanted to pull it out and write more about it, because it was very thought provoking, and a book I intend to buy (I borrowed it from the library) because I want to read it again.

Read on »

What To Read, What To Read

So, I’m trying to pick out what books to take on our cruise next week. Because of course that’s the most important thing to pack; clothes can just be plucked from the basket and chucked into the suitcase willy nilly the day before we leave, but reading requires some actual planning. (Now if this sounds

Read on »

Book Review Catch-Up

I’m way behind on writing little synopses of the books I’ve finished this year, so I’m consolidating this latest list. Looking back, this happened about this time of year last year, too. Must be a trend. Anyways, here’s what I read since whenever. Sword of the Guardian: A Legend of Ithyria (Legends of Ithyria) by

Read on »

Rejected Openings for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

From theonering.net One morning, when Harry Potter woke from troubled dreams, he found himself transformed in his bed into a horrible vermin. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single wizard in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wand. The sky above Privet Drive was the color of television,

Read on »

Heir to the Glimmering World

I also can’t find enough time to write a synopsis of Heir to the Glimmering World – a book I picked up in Chicago last July and just finished reading, so again I’m going to cheat and give you the synopsis/review From Publishers Weekly instead: Ozick’s previous novel, The Puttermesser Papers, revolved around one quirky

Read on »

The Thirteenth Tale

Unfortunately, I don’t have time to write a synopsis of The Thirteenth Tale – (I’ve been meaning to since I finished this fun, enjoyable book three weeks ago!) so I’ll have to cheat and give you Amazon’s instead: Settle down to enjoy a rousing good ghost story with Diane Setterfield’s debut novel, The Thirteenth Tale.

Read on »

David Sedaris Exaggerates!

The New Republic comes out with a world-rocking revelation: David Sedaris embellishes his humorous non-fiction memoirs. Um, no shit, Sherlock. You needed to write an article to tell us this? He’s a humor writer. I sort of figured out he was gilding the lily on my own, thanks. As if any one person has that

Read on »

The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters

A strange Victorian Steampunk novel that I enjoyed, despite it’s length and rather confusing cast of villains. Celeste Temple is a young English woman raised in the West Indies and residing in London awaiting a future wedding to her fiancé, Roger Bascombe. When he sends her a curt note breaking their engagement, she decides to

Read on »

The Big Over Easy: A Nursery Crime

A new series by the author of the bestselling “Tuesday Next” novels. A thoroughly enjoyable read; I polished it off in a weekend. Fforde’s novels are funny and full of literary cleverness. Jack Spratt is an likeable and entertaining protagonist and I look forward to reading the entire series. The Big Over Easy: A Nursery

Read on »

Georgette Heyer Novels and other Regency Historic Reading

Georgette Heyer Regency novels are some of my favorite guilty pleasures. I stumbled across Heyer when in junior high – which must have been about 1981 or so – and I was initially fascinated by the fact that several of her books had female characters that disguised themselves as men. At the time there were

Read on »

Song of Ice and Fire to be HBO Mini-Series

According to George R.R. Martin’s blog, and according to Variety: HBO turns ‘Fire’ into fantasy series HBO has acquired the rights to turn George R.R. Martin’s bestselling fantasy series “A Song of Fire & Ice” into a dramatic series to be written and exec produced by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss. “Fire” is the first

Read on »

Water for Elephants

21-year-old Jacob Jankowski is studying veterinary medicine in 1931, in the depths of the Great Depression, when his parents are killed in an auto accident. Jacob discovers they had mortgaged their lives to fund his schooling, and he is now penniless. Reeling from grief, he walks away from his final exams and drops out of

Read on »

What I Read in 2006 (49 Titles)

2006 was the 10th year I’ve kept track of what I’ve read, and eventually a decade retrospective is in order, but not tonight.
This year’s tally of books is roughly what it was last year – 49 titles. With a several of them being silly easy things, of course, because we were quite busy and I haven’t had the time to read that I used to. This year I managed to write a bit about most books and my impressions, which is cool, because I’ve looked at my past lists sometimes drawn a complete blank at the title and wondered what the heck it was about.

Read on »

Book Review – Rough Magicke

Author John Houghton sets his novel Rough Magicke in northwest Indiana, in the fictional county of Annandale originally created by classic Hoosier author Meredith Nicholson in the novel The House of a Thousand Candles – the locale corresponds pretty closely to the city of Culver, Indiana, a town nestled in around Lake Maxinkuckee, south of

Read on »

we’ve been going non-stop

And I haven’t had a free moment to blog. Or perhaps I have, but I spent it trying to unwind instead. We’ve been to parties galore, but I haven’t got the pictures off my camera yet. On Saturday morning we went to my company’s warehouse book sale and walked away with 91 books for about

Read on »

Book Review: Special Topics in Calamity Physics

Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl This is my favorite of the year, and will probably make the list of of my favorite books ever. I’m not sure I can do it justice in reviewing it, but I hope I can do a bit better than Publishers Weekly, whom I’m going to quote

Read on »

Books I’ve Read Recently

Company: A Novel by Max Barry Amazon Description: “With broad strokes, Barry once again satirizes corporate America in his third caustic novel (after Jennifer Government). This time, he takes aim at the perennial corporate crime of turning people into cogs in a machine. Recent b-school grad Stephen Jones, a fresh-faced new hire at a Seattle-based

Read on »

Books I’ve read Recently

Garden Accents: Simple-To-Build Projects to Enhance Your Yard or Garden (How-to Gardening) Quite a few interesting building projects for hardscaping your garden. I read this over while drawing up plans for our flowerbeds. Pit of Vipers (Nancy Drew (All New) Girl Detective) #18 by Carolyn Keene There are 21 books out now in this all

Read on »

Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things

Sneaky Uses for Everyday Things: How to Turn a Penny into a Radio, Make a Flood Alarm with an Aspirin, Change by Cy Tymony ISBN: 0740738593 NON-FICTION – A small guide to how to MacGyvver yourself out of situations using objects you may have with you. I checked the book out from the library, so

Read on »

Short Book Reviews

How Nancy Jackson Married Kate Wilson and Other Tales of Rebellious Girls and Daring Young Women by Mark Twain and John R. Cooley Library Journal: “A dozen minor Twain pieces to show how Twain used some of his slight fictions to idealize his daughters Clara and Suzy Clemens as romantic, rebellious, and daring adolescents in

Read on »

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald I first read this book when I was still a kid — either in junior high or high school, and I don’t remember caring too much for it, and feeling impatient to ge to the end. We read it again for our book club, and I’m very glad

Read on »

Gatsby Quotes

He smiled understandingly—much more than understandingly. It was one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four or five times in life. It faced—or seemed to face—the whole external world for an instant, and then concentrated on you with an irresistible prejudice in your favor.

Read on »

Progress Report

So far this year, I’ve read 30 books, and many of them have been pretty light reading. I guess I’m quite a bit behind Bush. At this point, I’ve pretty much abandoned my New Years Reading List and gone off on wild tangents, which seems to be a commentary on my life in general somehow.

Read on »

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists by Gideon Defoe Description from Amazon.com: Not since Moby-Dick… No, not since Treasure Island… Actually, not since Jonah and the Whale has there been a sea saga to rival The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists, featuring the greatest sea-faring hero of all time, the immortal Pirate Captain,

Read on »

On Bullshit

On Bullshit by Harry G. Frankfurt A small, funny book I picked up at the library after the author was interviewed on the Daily Show – it’s a scholarly inquiry on the definition of “bullshit.” From the Amazon.com description: “More pertinent is Frankfurt’s focus on intentions–the practice of bullshit, rather than its end result. Bullshitting,

Read on »

Sundown Towns

Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen I threw in the towel and bailed on reading this book in depth, which I’ve resolved not to feel bad about. I did skim a lot of it though. I’m a HUGE fan of sociologist Loewen’s books, and this one is good, but

Read on »

Don’t I know you?

Don’t I know you? by Karen Shepard FICTION – A mystery/thriller set in 1976 Manhattan about a woman, Gina Engel, who is murdered in her own apartment and discovered by her 12-year-old son Stephen. He narrates the first part of the story as he deals with his grief and tries to piece together anything he

Read on »

No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide: Behind the Scenes of Our Emerging Surveillance Society By Robert O’Harrow, Jr. NON-FICTION – Washington Post reporter Robert O’Harrow, Jr. delves into the world of data-collection and surveillance, and puts together a frightening and disheartening portrait of who is gathering personal information about you and why. I started to compile a

Read on »

“Cloud Atlas” and “The Whole World Over”

I haven’t much time to write a coherent review of each of these books, so I’m going to crib from Amazon to describe the plots. Sorry for that…. Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell “… Mitchell’s third novel weaves history, science, suspense, humor and pathos through six separate but loosely related narratives…. this latest foray relies

Read on »

Mini Book Reviews

I, Robot Isaac Asimov The classic sci-fi set of short stories by Asimov about Robots and their relationship to man. Asmimov sets out the famous “Three Laws of Robotics” that have influenced much science fiction writing since the stories were originally published in the 1940’s in sci-fi magazines, and then collected in this book published

Read on »

Social Networking for Bookworms

The Wall Street Journal writes about a new social networking site called LibraryThing.com — for people to create catalogs of their books. Similar to software like Booxter or Delicious Library, you record all of your books in a cataloging data set. But in this case the database is stored online, and is shared with other

Read on »

Mini Book Reviews

Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her by Melanie Rehak A great exploration of the history of the popular girl detective novels and the women who wrote them. I learned a couple of surprising things — that Nancy Drew was far and away the most popular of the Stratmeyer Syndicate’s kid book

Read on »

Books I’ve Read Recently

The Nanny Diaries by Emma McLaughlin and Nicola Kraus I enjoyed this light, comic novel as a easy summer reading book. I have to admit being frustrated by the level to which “Nanny” — the young female protagonist — put up with the crap of the Manhattan family that hired her to take care of

Read on »

Mini Book Reviews

I’m currently making my way through a couple of bigger books — The Watchmen (Absolute Edition) by Alan Moore, and A Theory of Fun for Game Design by Raph Koster. But in between I’ve read a couple of shorter, fun books. The World of Kong: A Natural History of Skull Island by Weta Workshop An

Read on »

Books that caught my eye

Stephanie and I went to the bookstore last night so she could use a gift certificate she received, and I wrote down a bunch of interesting books that I intend to either buy, check out from the library, or investigate further at some point in the future. Let me know if you’ve read any of

Read on »

Books to Read Before You Die

The British librarian’s organization — “Museum, Libraries and Archives Council” — has put together a List of Books to Read Before You Die. I have a pretty good start on the list. Of the ones I haven’t read yet, I have four on my bookshelves at home, so I’ll probably get to them someday. To

Read on »

Stakeout on Millennium Drive

I hate throwing in the towel on books. I feel guilty if I can’t get through one, and I will struggle to the end of even the most difficult stuff. And I wanted to like Stakeout on Millennium Drive; I really did. It is, after all, a book set in Indianapolis, by a native writer,

Read on »

Photoshop Hacks: Choose Your Own Adventure Novels

My brother Todd had a ton of the Choose Your Own Adventure novels (the early version of video games). Check out Something Awful’s photoshop contest for “Rejected CYOA Books.” My favorites are “Don’t Bother, You Die In Most of the Endings Anyway” and “Everyone Wants to Touch My Giant Snake and Jewels.” Also: “Shrödinger’s Cat.

Read on »

“The Kiterunner” does not contain “pornography”

Some (idiot moron) parents in Lawrence Township schools are objecting to the book “The Kiterunner” being assigned in class, because they claim there is a scene that is “pornographic” in it. The Kiterunner is a story of children living in contemporary Afghanistan, and is a wonderful, amazing book. It is, unfortunately, fairly true to life,

Read on »

Stranger In a Strange Land

This is a book club, book, so of course I have to abide by the first and second rules of book club and not talk about it before we meet. But I have to write about it soon, or I’m going to forget details of what I wanted to say about it. So, book club

Read on »

Superhero Reading List

To my Amazon Wish List, I just added: How To Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion by Daniel H. Wilson The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks Real Ultimate Power: The Official Ninja Book by Robert Hamburger The Government Manual for New Superheroes

Read on »

100 Best First Lines from Novels

According to the American Book Review: 1. Call me Ishmael. —Herman Melville, Moby-Dick (1851) 2. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. —Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813) 3. A screaming comes across the sky. —Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow

Read on »

Best Lesbian Erotica 2006 (Best Lesbian Erotica Series)

Best Lesbian Erotica 2006 (Best Lesbian Erotica Series) by Tristan Taormino, Eileen Myles This was better than most lesbian erotica books I’ve read, I have to say. I’m normally not a huge fan of the genre because it’s often so badly written that I can’t suspend my disbelief long enough to go for the ride.

Read on »

Which Edward Gorey Book Are You?

The GashlyCrumb Tinies – You have a terribly wickedsense of humour and people are drawn to yourwit. Children beware of the thin, pale manwith the black umbrella! Which Edward Gorey Book Are You? brought to you by Quizilla

Read on »

A Feast For Crows: worth the wait

I finished up reading George R. R. Martin’s long-awaited fourth fantasy novel A Feast for Crows today. I’m dying to find out what happens next. The fifth book (A Dance of Dragons) in the “Song of Ice and Fire” series is due out sometime this year, and if it does drop (Martin is notorious for

Read on »

A Feast for Crows: starting the book

I started reading one of the books I bought with my Barnes and Noble gift cards, A Feast for Crows this week. It’s the fourth book in the fantasy series “A Song of Ice and Fire” by George R. R. Martin. I really enjoy this series because it turns many of the tired fantasy cliches

Read on »

2006 Library Booksale Schedule

Courtesy my friend Melissa, here’s the schedule for the library sales in 2006. Not that I need any more books than I already have. That has to be one of my New Years Resolutions: no buying books other than for Book Club. Holy crap! They have an online zShop at Amazon.com, too.

Read on »

What I Read in 2005 (51 Titles)

I’m going to change around a bit how I record the books I’ve read. This coming year, I’ll log titles by doing a short blog entry about them, instead of doing a running list as I have in years past.

Read on »

New Yorker Article on P. L. Travers

New Yorker article discusses how much author P. L. Travers dislike the movie version of her Mary Poppins book, even though it made her rich. In examining some details about Travers’ life, it become evident that the movie seems to have an opposite message from the one she may have intended.

Read on »

Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book

I heard this report first that a student from UMass Dartmouth had received a visit from the Department of Homeland Security after reserving a copy of Mao Tse-Tung’s “Little Red Book” of quotes through inter-library loan. My initial impulse was to buy a copy of the book to see what would happen. Thankfully, I didn’t,

Read on »

Time’s 100 Best Novels 1923-present

Bil asked the question: how many of Time’s list of 100 Best Novels have you read? 41 of them. Most of them in high school or college English classes. When I read the list I was disappointed at what was missing and some of the crap they included. These people can’t tell me they actually

Read on »

Banned Books Week

Oops, I forgot to mention at the beginning of the week that this is Banned Books Week. Go check out a challenged or banned book from your local library and celebrate freedom from censorship. Also be sure to stand up against book banning. The American Library Association has a list of other great things you

Read on »

Mini Reviews

I’ve been meaning to write reviews for all these things for a while, but I’ve been so busy I haven’t had time. So here are my mini reviews, because I can’t seem to keep up with everything. All the President’s Men I watched this movie for the first time this past weekend, and it was

Read on »

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

I finished reading the new Harry Potter book last night. Throughout the book I had a notion in my head of the answers to two of the mysteries; who the half-blood prince is, and who dies in the book (don’t yell at me about spoilers; the death is commonly known!).

Read on »

Weekend Update 2004-01-26

I finished sanding the edges of the floor in the living room, and did the full-scale cleanup of sawdust required. I hoped that I’d have enough time to start staining the floors, but that was overly ambitious. The edger sander was really hard to control — I was exhausted when I finished Saturday, and today

Read on »

Village Voice: Our 25 Favorite Books of 2003

The Village Voice Actress in the House By Joseph McElroy OVER OK, 432 PP., $26.95 Buy this book It begins with a stage-slap, witnessed by a man named Daley, then spirals into cul-de-sacs of memory, ruminations on love and aging, ever returning to the linear narrative–the coupling of the actress and the man–before setting out

Read on »

Mad Tea Party

From Alice in Wonderland: The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?” “Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice. “I’m glad they’ve begun asking riddles.–I believe I can guess that,” she added aloud. “Do you mean that you think

Read on »

Vintage International Catalog

Vintage International: Devoted to publishing the best writing of the twentieth century from the world over, Vintage International offers both classic and contemporary fiction and literary nonfiction in elegant paperback editions. Abe, Kobo. Ark Sakura Abe, Kobo. Kangaroo Notebook Abe, Kobo. Woman in the Dunes Aksyonov, Vassily. Generations of Winter Amis, Martin. Dead Babies Amis,

Read on »

Read the book before the movie

Favorite thing that happened yesterday: I was watching Entertainment Tonight, where they were covering the premiere of Harry Potter in England, and they interviewed all the celebrities going to see the movie, including Cher. And they asked them “Are you excited about the premiere of the movie?” And every one of the had to admit

Read on »

My Birthday

Dan and Doug took me out to dinner, and gave me North By Northwest and Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and My sister gave me a fondue pot, ice crusher, and goth chick Barbie. So my birthday turned out pretty damned cool. Fake book on Amazon: American Foreign Policy by G. W. Bush Fake reviewers on

Read on »

new house

Picked up the keys to my new house today. Went in, figured out how the security alarm works (No, I ain’t gonna tell *you*) and generally wandered around looking in the fridge, oven and closets. Then I decided to look in the cellar and see what was down there. So I hoisted up the door

Read on »

Random House Modern Library Catalog

“The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennet Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern

Read on »

The Library of America

History and Mission Statement (from LOA web site, 3/99): “The Library of America was founded in 1979 to undertake a historic endeavor: to help preserve the nation’s cultural heritage by publishing America’s best and most significant writing in durable and authoritative editions.” “The idea for The Library of America was first discussed some thirty years

Read on »

Everyman’s Library

“Everyman’s Library, founded in 1906 and relaunched in 1991 [by Alfred E. Knopf, a division of Random House], aims to offer the most complete library in the English language of the world’s classics. Each volume is printed in a classic typeface on acid-free, cream-wove paper with a sewn full cloth binding.” This is the March

Read on »

Writer’s Paradise

Author Unknown A writer dies and due to a bureaucratic snafu in the the afterworld, she is allowed to choose her own fate: heaven or hell for all eternity. Being a very shrewd dead person, she asks St. Peter for a tour of both. The first stop is hell where she sees rows and rows

Read on »

Jean-Paul Sartre’s Cooking Diary

Author Unknown October 3 Spoke with Camus today about my cookbook. Though he has never actually eaten, he gave me much encouragement. I rushed home immediately to begin work. How excited I am! I have begun my formula for a Denver omelet. October 4 Still working on the omelet. There have been stumbling blocks. I

Read on »

Dr. Seuss Books that Were Rejected by His Publisher

Author Unknown How the Grinch Stole Columbus Day Marvin K. Mooney, Get the F*ck Out! The Cat in the Microwave Herbert the Pervert Likes Sherbert Your Colon Can Moo-Can You? The Fox in Detox The Grinch’s Ten Inches One Bitch, Two Bitch, Dead Bitch, Blue Bitch Zippy the Gerbil My Pocket Rocket Needs a Socket

Read on »

Random House Modern Library Readers’ 100 Best Novels

In response to their list of 100 best novels, the Modern library let the readers respond with their favorite books. This list was derived from an online user poll conducted on the Modern Library web site from July 20 to October 20, 1998, during which 217,520 votes were cast. **Note from Steph: Consider the first

Read on »

Random House Modern Library’s 100 Best Novels

In 1998 the Modern Library, a division of Random House, New York, released this list of ‘the 100 best novels written in the English language and published since 1900.’ The jurors were Daniel J. Boorstin, A.S. Byatt, Christopher Cerf, Shelby Foote, Vartan Gregorian, Edmund Morris, John Richardson, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., William Styron, and Gore Vidal.

Read on »

Literary Terms I Like

From Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia Accismus Irony involving insincere modesty Aesthetic distance A term that describes the ability to objectify experience in art and present it as independent from its maker. Argus-eyed Jealously watchful Beatrice Dante’s symbol of Spiritual inspiration Bell, book and candle Used in the ceremony of excommunication. Berserker Wild, warlike being, possesed of

Read on »