Posts Tagged: reading

Read 26 Indy Reading Challenge for 2014

Early in January of 2014, Indy Star Reporter Michael Anthony Adams issued a challenge to Indiana residents for the new year: New Year’s resolutions are rarely acted on. I’m guilty of it, and you’re guilty of it. The trick is to have support, which is exactly what #Read26Indy is. But instead of having a few

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Nancy Drew “Girl Detective” T-shirt

I’ve loved Nancy Drew since I was a kid, and I had a cool shirt with Pamela Sue Martin’s face on in when I was in elementary school. I always wished I had one with the silhouette on it, so I made one for myself. And you, if you want to buy one. They’re for

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links for 2010-12-13

The Women of World War I (tags: women wwi history gender feminism) 5. The History of Girls' School Stories reading notes. (tags: literature history women education)

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Me and my shallow brain

Howdy? How have you all been. It’s been so long since we talked. I’ve been cheating on you with Facebook, I admit it. But Facebook is giving me tennis elbow, (damned Farmville!) so I need to lay off the junk for awhile. Also, according to Nicholas Carr in his rather alarming book The Shallows: What

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links for 2010-01-21

The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House What follows is a brief discussion of Audre Lorde's often-quoted statement, "The master's tools will never dismantle the master's house." (tags: feminism Lorde ideas) Hej Cyklist! Copenhagen Has a New Bike-friendly Feature – GOOD Blog – GOOD Copenhagen installs food rests for cyclists stopped at lights.

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Stimulating Reading

My feed reader is often a bloodbath; I add to and purge my regular web reading ruthlessly, and yet it’s always overstuffed and I’m perpetually behind. There are some mainstays; ego surfing my own feeds and some friends to whom I would feel embarrassed conversing In Real Life if I hadn’t kept up with their

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Books I Read in 2008

It’s my 12th Annual end of the year reading recap. Grand total: 30 books. I don’t think that’s my lowest total, but it’s no 98 titles like in 1997. And boy, oh boy did I hit the genre fiction this year. It did help to have lots of fun light reading while all the wedding

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Books I’ve Read – November and December 2008

A Grave Talent (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King To Play The Fool (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King With Child (Kate Martinelli Mysteries) by Laurie R. King Earlier this year, I read the fourth and fifth books in the Kate Martinelli Series. This time I circled back around and read the first

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Recently Acquired Books

Books I just picked up from the book store: Full Frontal Feminism: A Young Woman’s Guide to Why Feminism Matters by Jessica Valenti Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die by Chip Heath and Dan Heath

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Favorite children’s book character?

This came out of a discussion at work — who’s your favorite children’s book character? Obviously, mine is Curious George, but there are lots on my list. Who is on yours? The Complete Adventures of Curious George: 70th Anniversary Edition

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1st Corinthians 13:4-13

Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant. Love does not act unbecomingly; it does not seek its own, is not provoked, does not take into account a wrong suffered, does not rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes

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Selections from Leaves of Grass, Song of the Open Road

by Walt Whitman from verse 9 However sweet these laid-up stores–however convenient this dwelling, we cannot remain here; However shelter’d this port, and however calm these waters, we must not anchor here; However welcome the hospitality that surrounds us, we are permitted to receive it but a little while. … from verse 11 Listen! I

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Books I Got for Christmas 2007

Part of the awesome loot I got this holiday season from my family. The Daring Book for Girls by Andrea J. Buchanan and Miriam Peskowitz The Best of MAKE Magazine by Mark Frauenfelder and Gareth Branwyn Guerrilla Gardening: A Manualfesto by David Tracey Buffy the Vampire Slayer Season Eight, Volume 1: The Long Way Home

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Books, Books, Books

This past weekend, Stephanie and I went to my company’s warehouse employee book sale. This is where they lay out all the returned stock from bookstores and let us purchase it at a steep discount, which means that it doesn’t need to get recycled or trashed. It’s one of the great perks of my job

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What To Read, What To Read

So, I’m trying to pick out what books to take on our cruise next week. Because of course that’s the most important thing to pack; clothes can just be plucked from the basket and chucked into the suitcase willy nilly the day before we leave, but reading requires some actual planning. (Now if this sounds

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Heir to the Glimmering World

I also can’t find enough time to write a synopsis of Heir to the Glimmering World – a book I picked up in Chicago last July and just finished reading, so again I’m going to cheat and give you the synopsis/review From Publishers Weekly instead: Ozick’s previous novel, The Puttermesser Papers, revolved around one quirky

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The Thirteenth Tale

Unfortunately, I don’t have time to write a synopsis of The Thirteenth Tale – (I’ve been meaning to since I finished this fun, enjoyable book three weeks ago!) so I’ll have to cheat and give you Amazon’s instead: Settle down to enjoy a rousing good ghost story with Diane Setterfield’s debut novel, The Thirteenth Tale.

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The Glass Books of the Dream Eaters

A strange Victorian Steampunk novel that I enjoyed, despite it’s length and rather confusing cast of villains. Celeste Temple is a young English woman raised in the West Indies and residing in London awaiting a future wedding to her fiancé, Roger Bascombe. When he sends her a curt note breaking their engagement, she decides to

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Water for Elephants

21-year-old Jacob Jankowski is studying veterinary medicine in 1931, in the depths of the Great Depression, when his parents are killed in an auto accident. Jacob discovers they had mortgaged their lives to fund his schooling, and he is now penniless. Reeling from grief, he walks away from his final exams and drops out of

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Book Review – Rough Magicke

Author John Houghton sets his novel Rough Magicke in northwest Indiana, in the fictional county of Annandale originally created by classic Hoosier author Meredith Nicholson in the novel The House of a Thousand Candles – the locale corresponds pretty closely to the city of Culver, Indiana, a town nestled in around Lake Maxinkuckee, south of

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Book Review: Special Topics in Calamity Physics

Special Topics in Calamity Physics by Marisha Pessl This is my favorite of the year, and will probably make the list of of my favorite books ever. I’m not sure I can do it justice in reviewing it, but I hope I can do a bit better than Publishers Weekly, whom I’m going to quote

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International Literacy Day!

Hey, it’s International Literacy Day, according to a UN resolution. I know we don’t take those very seriously here in Amurika, but literacy is important! You too could grow up to get in a readin’ contest with Karl Rove.

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Books to Read Before You Die

The British librarian’s organization — “Museum, Libraries and Archives Council” — has put together a List of Books to Read Before You Die. I have a pretty good start on the list. Of the ones I haven’t read yet, I have four on my bookshelves at home, so I’ll probably get to them someday. To

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Stakeout on Millennium Drive

I hate throwing in the towel on books. I feel guilty if I can’t get through one, and I will struggle to the end of even the most difficult stuff. And I wanted to like Stakeout on Millennium Drive; I really did. It is, after all, a book set in Indianapolis, by a native writer,

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Weekend Update 2006-02-20

What I accomplished this weekend: Comment Code – I worked on the comment code on my site to accomplish: Cleaner xhtml and css. This was hard, but I got it working well. Displaying the number next to the comment. This wasn’t hard. Displaying comments from me in a different color than others. This seemed to

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Superhero Reading List

To my Amazon Wish List, I just added: How To Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips on Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion by Daniel H. Wilson The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead by Max Brooks Real Ultimate Power: The Official Ninja Book by Robert Hamburger The Government Manual for New Superheroes

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100 Best First Lines from Novels

According to the American Book Review: 1. Call me Ishmael. —Herman Melville, Moby-Dick (1851) 2. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. —Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813) 3. A screaming comes across the sky. —Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow

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Best Lesbian Erotica 2006 (Best Lesbian Erotica Series)

Best Lesbian Erotica 2006 (Best Lesbian Erotica Series) by Tristan Taormino, Eileen Myles This was better than most lesbian erotica books I’ve read, I have to say. I’m normally not a huge fan of the genre because it’s often so badly written that I can’t suspend my disbelief long enough to go for the ride.

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Which Edward Gorey Book Are You?

The GashlyCrumb Tinies – You have a terribly wickedsense of humour and people are drawn to yourwit. Children beware of the thin, pale manwith the black umbrella! Which Edward Gorey Book Are You? brought to you by Quizilla

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A Feast For Crows: worth the wait

I finished up reading George R. R. Martin’s long-awaited fourth fantasy novel A Feast for Crows today. I’m dying to find out what happens next. The fifth book (A Dance of Dragons) in the “Song of Ice and Fire” series is due out sometime this year, and if it does drop (Martin is notorious for

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A Feast for Crows: starting the book

I started reading one of the books I bought with my Barnes and Noble gift cards, A Feast for Crows this week. It’s the fourth book in the fantasy series “A Song of Ice and Fire” by George R. R. Martin. I really enjoy this series because it turns many of the tired fantasy cliches

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What I Read in 2005 (51 Titles)

I’m going to change around a bit how I record the books I’ve read. This coming year, I’ll log titles by doing a short blog entry about them, instead of doing a running list as I have in years past.

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New Yorker Article on P. L. Travers

New Yorker article discusses how much author P. L. Travers dislike the movie version of her Mary Poppins book, even though it made her rich. In examining some details about Travers’ life, it become evident that the movie seems to have an opposite message from the one she may have intended.

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Banned Books Week

Oops, I forgot to mention at the beginning of the week that this is Banned Books Week. Go check out a challenged or banned book from your local library and celebrate freedom from censorship. Also be sure to stand up against book banning. The American Library Association has a list of other great things you

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Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

I finished reading the new Harry Potter book last night. Throughout the book I had a notion in my head of the answers to two of the mysteries; who the half-blood prince is, and who dies in the book (don’t yell at me about spoilers; the death is commonly known!).

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Trivial Pursuit: Book Lover’s Edition

The Book Lover’s Edition is played very similarly to the regular editions of Trivial Pursuit; the goal is to collect pieces of pie representing different categories of questions, and then to land directly on the center of the board to answer a final question in the category chosen for you by your opponents. Unlike other

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This weekend, I…

1) Had fun at Girls Game Night at Outword Bound books. 2) Washed my truck and cleaned it all out. 3) Raked my leaves. 4) Bought a table, a cabinet and copper trellis from Urban Bloom, because they’re going out of business. 5) Visited my mom to take her Dutch Letters, a book, and

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Mad Tea Party

From Alice in Wonderland: The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?” “Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice. “I’m glad they’ve begun asking riddles.–I believe I can guess that,” she added aloud. “Do you mean that you think

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Literary Terms I Like

From Benet’s Reader’s Encyclopedia Accismus Irony involving insincere modesty Aesthetic distance A term that describes the ability to objectify experience in art and present it as independent from its maker. Argus-eyed Jealously watchful Beatrice Dante’s symbol of Spiritual inspiration Bell, book and candle Used in the ceremony of excommunication. Berserker Wild, warlike being, possesed of

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