Posts Tagged: ideas

Conceit via. Wikipedia

via Wikipedia, Conceit: In literature, a conceit is an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. By juxtaposing, usurping and manipulating images and ideas in surprising ways, a conceit invites the reader into a more sophisticated understanding of an object of comparison. Extended conceits in English are part

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‘Azimuth’ via Wikipedia

via: Azimuth – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. An azimuth i/ˈæzɪməθ/; from Arabic السمت as‑samt, meaning “a way, a part, or quarter” is an angular measurement in a spherical coordinate system. The vector from an observer origin to a point of interest is projected perpendicularly onto a reference plane; the angle between the projected vector and

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‘The Wild Hunt’ via wikipedia

via Wikipedia, the Wild Hunt: The Wild Hunt is an ancient folk myth prevalent across Northern, Western and Central Europe. The fundamental premise in all instances is the same: a phantasmal, spectral group of huntsmen with the accoutrements of hunting, with horses and hounds in mad pursuit across the skies or along the ground, or

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Evolutionary Psychology and its Top Ten Failures

This is worth reading… Via Dr. Beetle: Evolutionary Psychology and its Top Ten Failures. The dreadful pseudo science of evolutionary psychology is founded upon concepts such as survival of the fittest, selfish genes, inherited instincts and mind modules. It has shot to prominence in science and societies’ thinking, and found many a willing ear.

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Wheaton’s Law

Wheaton’s Law via Know Your Meme. Wheaton’s law is, of course, “Don’t be a dick.” I had never seen the Know Your Meme website before; it’s a nice idea, run by the Cheezburger folks.

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Dostoevsky on the Problem of Evil

Dostoevsky on the Problem of Evil. … And if the sufferings of children go to swell the sum of sufferings which was necessary to pay for truth, then I protest that the truth is not worth such a price. I don’t want the mother to embrace the oppressor who threw her son to the dogs!

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‘The Ancient of Days’, ‘Thumos’ via wikipedia

via wikipedia: The Ancient of Days The title “Ancient of Days” has been used as a source of inspiration in art and music, denoting the Creator’s aspects of eternity combined with perfection. William Blake’s watercolour and relief etching entitled “The Ancient of Days” is one such example. The Ancient of Days is the title of

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Comments Elsewhere

Jonah Lehrer, the author of Proust Was A Neuroscientist (which I have) and the new book How We Decide (on my wishlist) has an interesting article on the Frontal Cortex science blog regarding Costco and how it affects our decision-making regarding pricing. To which I contributed this in the comments: You should study my wife

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In search of the next Lost

Entertainment Weekly has an interesting article in their current issue about all of the shows written to be the next big Lost and how none of them seem to be taking off in the way the networks are hoping. I am watching FlashFoward, and it’s interesting, but most of the shows are missing a key

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links for 2010-03-04

BBC News – The art of list-making "A collection of attributes the Finnish architect Eero Saarinen found most attractive in his wife. First on his list is the fact she was very clever." – excellent. I knew I liked that guy. (tags: psychology lists ideas art writing) IPS cutting art, music teachers to trim deficit

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links for 2010-02-12

List of cognitive biases – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (tags: science lifehacks psychology logic) May Wright Sewall – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Indianapolis' resident suffragette and feminist. (tags: feminism suffrage voting women) National American Woman Suffrage Association – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia If you look at the section "background conflict" there are some really interesting

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links for 2010-02-02

The U.S. National Archives' collections on Flickr Awesome. (tags: photography history government flickr) 10 Americans Arrested In Haiti, Accused Of Child Trafficking Idaho Baptist group tried to smuggle 33 kids out of Haiti through the Dominican Republic. Some of the children knew their parents were alive, and just hadn't been reunited with them yet. (tags:

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links for 2010-01-27

8 guides to apply jQuery and ImageSwitch in web design | HieuUK (tags: flipclock) Indianapolis, New Orleans mayors place Super Bowl wagers | IndyStar.com | The Indianapolis Star Yeah, we're going them shrimp from St. Elmo's. Yes, you read that right; we sending SHRIMP south, to NEW ORLEANS. Which is probably where we flew it

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What motivates me

I’m not motivated by a bunch of platitudes about “finding the edge” and “exploiting your potential.” I’m not motivated by people who engage in competitive behavior with people they should be collaborating with. I’m not motivated by people who rest on their laurels and do the bare minimum to get by, or people who spend

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Ruining It for the Rest of Us

I only follow a couple of podcasts regularly because my drive to work is relatively short, and I otherwise can’t keep up. But I happened to read about one particular episode of This American Life – entitled Ruining It for the Rest of Us – on a blog somewhere, and was interested enough to loop

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The Power of Day Dreaming

The most common criticism I received when I was a kid was that I daydreamed too much, especially in class. Even though my classwork was high quality, staring off into space would set my teachers off all the time, and it was one of the things I was always very upset about, because it never

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links for 2008-03-16

Tulsa World: Kern’s son denies gay rumors Oh, for pete’s sake. (tags: lgbt rights news equality) The HBR List: Breakthrough Ideas for 2008 Some interesting ideas about business here, especially alternate reality business. (tags: business innovation ideas productivity 2008) The Myth of Sisyphus – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (tags: mythology philosophy ideas) Our Favorite Typefaces

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My reality show concept: Celebrity Karaoke Roulette

Shakespeare’s Sister question of the day the other day was: “You’ve been given unlimited resources and creative control to create your own contest reality show (a la Project Runway) or game show: What’s your concept?” I’ve had this one rolling around in my head: Celebrity Karaoke Roulette. Take five famous musicians, throw them up on

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How Primary Elections Could Be Better

The U.S. would have five days of political primaries, each a week apart, starting the last week of March. The first primary day would consist of the 10 states with the smallest voting population; the rest would increase upward until the fifth week when the largest voting states would hold their primaries in the final

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Everything is Miscellaneous

I mentioned the book Everything is Miscellaneous a few posts back on my list of recent reads, but I wanted to pull it out and write more about it, because it was very thought provoking, and a book I intend to buy (I borrowed it from the library) because I want to read it again.

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Biomimicry, the law of unintended consequences, Chinese water torture

Via wikipedia: Biomimicry Biomimicry or biomimetics is the examination of nature, its models, systems, processes, and elements to emulate or take inspiration from in order to solve human problems. The term biomimicry and biomimetics come from the Greek words bios, meaning life, and mimesis, meaning to imitate. Similar terms include bionics. Law of unintended consequences

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The Golden Days of Usenet: Godwin’s Law

Godwin’s Law: prov. [Usenet] “As a Usenet argument grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one.” There is a tradition in many groups that, once this occurs, that thread is over, and whoever mentioned the Nazis has automatically lost whatever argument was in progress. Godwin’s Law thus practically guarantees the

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I Love Television

There are tons of people I know who say things like “I never watch TV.” I’m not one of those. I watch TV. A lot. Usually while doing other things, like laundry, reading, working on the house… but I watch TV. I love TV. Well, the good shows, anyway. Because of the harsh winter this

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We’ll call it…

Why is it that when someone utters the phrase “We’ll call it….” when trying to introduce a new phrase or idiom, that whatever they come up with is invariably stupid? Idioms don’t come from pronouncements. They happen colloquially. In case you’re wondering, this is in reference to something specific someone said to me. Don’t worry,

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Wabi Sabi

Japanese Aesthetic principle: Wabi-sabi is a beauty of things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete. It is the beauty of things modest and humble. It is the beauty of things unconventional. Material characteristics of wabi-sabi: suggestion of natural process, irregular, intimate, unpretentious, earthy,simple. From UTNE Reader: According to Japanese legend, in the sixteenth century Sen no Rikyu

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‘Cambrian Explosion’

Remember when you were a kid, and all of the sudden, for no apparent reason, you shot up several inches one summer? Like growth wasn’t a slow, glacial process but an abrupt one? Sort of like some of the theories on evolution that suggest mutations aren’t as gradual as we think. (A Cambrian Explosion, per

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