Posts Tagged: book

Books to Read Before You Die

The British librarian’s organization — “Museum, Libraries and Archives Council” — has put together a List of Books to Read Before You Die. I have a pretty good start on the list. Of the ones I haven’t read yet, I have four on my bookshelves at home, so I’ll probably get to them someday. To

Read on »

Quad Cities Censorship

This is an interesting article in the Quad City Times, about a book called “The Misfits” that was banned at the elementary school level in the Quad Cities. “I knew I had all of those signs of being gay, and I couldn’t make sense of it,” said Howe, who wrote “The Misfits,” a book about

Read on »

Scaling Down

I borrowed the book “Scaling Down” (by Judi Culbertson and Marj Decker) from my girlfriend Stephanie, because we’re both attempting to sort through the things we own and uh, scale down. We’ve got to figure out how we’re going to merge households, and for two people who both own two-story, multi-bedroom homes packed with stuff,

Read on »

100 Best First Lines from Novels

According to the American Book Review: 1. Call me Ishmael. —Herman Melville, Moby-Dick (1851) 2. It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. —Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice (1813) 3. A screaming comes across the sky. —Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow

Read on »

Which Edward Gorey Book Are You?

The GashlyCrumb Tinies – You have a terribly wickedsense of humour and people are drawn to yourwit. Children beware of the thin, pale manwith the black umbrella! Which Edward Gorey Book Are You? brought to you by Quizilla

Read on »

A Feast for Crows: starting the book

I started reading one of the books I bought with my Barnes and Noble gift cards, A Feast for Crows this week. It’s the fourth book in the fantasy series “A Song of Ice and Fire” by George R. R. Martin. I really enjoy this series because it turns many of the tired fantasy cliches

Read on »

What I Read in 2005 (51 Titles)

I’m going to change around a bit how I record the books I’ve read. This coming year, I’ll log titles by doing a short blog entry about them, instead of doing a running list as I have in years past.

Read on »

New Yorker Article on P. L. Travers

New Yorker article discusses how much author P. L. Travers dislike the movie version of her Mary Poppins book, even though it made her rich. In examining some details about Travers’ life, it become evident that the movie seems to have an opposite message from the one she may have intended.

Read on »

Chairman Mao’s Little Red Book

I heard this report first that a student from UMass Dartmouth had received a visit from the Department of Homeland Security after reserving a copy of Mao Tse-Tung’s “Little Red Book” of quotes through inter-library loan. My initial impulse was to buy a copy of the book to see what would happen. Thankfully, I didn’t,

Read on »

Mad Tea Party

From Alice in Wonderland: The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, “Why is a raven like a writing-desk?” “Come, we shall have some fun now!” thought Alice. “I’m glad they’ve begun asking riddles.–I believe I can guess that,” she added aloud. “Do you mean that you think

Read on »

Random House Modern Library Catalog

“The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennet Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern

Read on »

Everyman’s Library

“Everyman’s Library, founded in 1906 and relaunched in 1991 [by Alfred E. Knopf, a division of Random House], aims to offer the most complete library in the English language of the world’s classics. Each volume is printed in a classic typeface on acid-free, cream-wove paper with a sewn full cloth binding.” This is the March

Read on »